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Learn To Write Arabic


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#61 Rich L

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 21:43

Ah - I see now. I don't know if there is word صمار but thought it might be a variation of السمار (to chat - I think).

The 'laam' typically joins the 'Haa' at the top of the first horizontal stroke and the mouth of the 'Haa' is left open like this الحمار (except the meem should be under the horizontal as in your example).

This is covered in Lesson 10.

Salman


Right! Clearly my confusing error. That donkey didn't learn!

I think I have seen the laam - Haa' written as follows, as well.

Cheers,
Rich

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#62 smk

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 23:53

Rich - it looked like your written version when I was typing it :headsmack:

The join you have used is the one used in handwriting, the join in my typed version is used in Typography and Calligraphy - I believe I have mentioned this in the video.

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#63 Rich L

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 07:06

Your new and improved camera angle is perfect!

Cheers,
Rich

Edited by Rich L, 05 December 2012 - 07:06.

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#64 Ghost Plane

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 00:20

Anyone making any progress? Taking care of a Persian friend after her surgery, so I don't have a lot of pen time, but I might pick up some pointers. :hmm1:

#65 94Terp

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 15:39

Outstanding! Glad I stumbled on this thread. Kind of got this backwards... I became interested in FPs to enhance / accentuate / further develop the writing sections of my MSA courses for grad school. Writing the words out with a Pilot ball point, (diposable... sorry), is certainly enjoyable, but I want to capture and save some of the artistic qualities of the language, (especially since my written English is utterly trashed). Shukrahn for putting the examples up. It's great to see examples of where this can be taken.

I look forward to more form this thread!!!


Salaam.
Scott
<My avatar is an example of Bismallah (Islamic) caligraphy, that says "In the name of Allah, Most Merciful, Most Gracious". As a side note, I am neither Islamic, nor particularly religious. I just think it's really cool.>

#66 smk

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 16:20

Anyone making any progress?


I would like to know too :-)

I had a couple of more videos planned but since nobody has posted anything for feedback I wasn't sure this was helping anyone.

Scott - I'm glad you find this useful. I will probably do the remaining two videos in a week or so just to reach a milestone :-)

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#67 Linsolv

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 18:10

I'm a native English speaker, as I imagine most people on the board are, and I've been learning Arabic with the Alif Baa books (and a class. I guess it would be fairer to say I'm learning with a class. I need those 4 credits a semester!)

There are a few things that are perfectly clear from smk's posts (haven't watched the videos because I wanted to catch up to the thread) such as the numerous shortcuts (these, I did not learn until my second semester, and even then I tend to write pretty fully. I think I only use the siin-as-line bit, per se. However, what he doesn't mention is how... ah... "unique" handwriting can get. I worked with a few people during the last semester who were Arabic and taking the class because it's easy for them. One of them, from Iraq, had handwriting I could not really read. I don't have a sample of it now that the class is over, but I do have a loose script for an incredibly simplistic skit we had to write and perform, which was written by someone with slightly more "standard" handwriting. A lot of the time, I see Americans that are kinda used to seeing the book-Arabic, which is so rarely used outside of street signs and calligraphy that it's basically worthless for something like correspondence and written notes. (Maybe most people aren't used to attending a college in Dearborn, though, which is one of the few places you see lots of native English speakers AND lots of native Arabic speakers that I am aware of in Michigan, if not the US as a whole...)

So I think it's important to keep tabs on that difference, because it's a fair bit bigger than in typed-versus-handwritten Latin characters.

(As a side note, I really prefer the geometric Kufic scripts to the more "ornamental" stuff. I've seen a few scans of early Qurans, back when Kufic was the style and I just really find it gorgeous, but at the same time more readable than Ruq'ah or even Nashk... except that they hadn't adopted widespread use of dots, in the same way that most harakat are not used now, which made things hard)

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Edited by Linsolv, 20 December 2012 - 18:15.


#68 94Terp

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 19:56

First testing of the new Lamy Safari. It's a process.

- Tasharrafna (Pleased to meet you)

- Anah Scott, w-ente? (I'm Scott.. and you are?)

- Kayf alhal? (How are you?)

- Alhamduillah (Thanks be to God)

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<My avatar is an example of Bismallah (Islamic) caligraphy, that says "In the name of Allah, Most Merciful, Most Gracious". As a side note, I am neither Islamic, nor particularly religious. I just think it's really cool.>

#69 Linsolv

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 21:48

I had a few negative comments so I thought I'd put my own handwriting out there, so I could at least be criticized for not learning English properly, lol.

Next time a chance comes up to show off my Arabic, I'll do that too. Just because I don't feel like it's fair for me to be sitting here judging people from behind a curtain or something.

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Edited by Linsolv, 22 December 2012 - 21:49.


#70 smk

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:04

First testing of the new Lamy Safari. It's a process.

- Tasharrafna (Pleased to meet you)

- Anah Scott, w-ente? (I'm Scott.. and you are?)

- Kayf alhal? (How are you?)

- Alhamduillah (Thanks be to God)


That is a good attempt. It seems like you are attempting to replicate typographical forms of the letters which makes writing quite inefficient.

I quite agree with points 1 and 3 of Linsolv's feedback. On point 2, I believe the dots will be fine once you reduce the size of the notches in your 'shiin'.

Also, it's more fluent to write a 'Haa' in the middle of the word if you join it at the top (see example below). In Alhamd-u-lillah, you need two 'laam's as I have shown in the example below. Also, 'meem' goes under the line when writing.

Finally, I wouldn't write 'Scott' with a 'Saad'. I have shown how I would write it but consider it only as an option, not an authoritative 'correct' form.

Check out the lessons on the joined form of 'Haa' and 'sheen' (Lessons 10 and 12).

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#71 smk

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:14

However, what he doesn't mention is how... ah... "unique" handwriting can get.


I believe I do mention the variations of how things might appear in handwritten form in the videos here and there.

A lot of the time, I see Americans that are kinda used to seeing the book-Arabic, which is so rarely used outside of street signs and calligraphy that it's basically worthless for something like correspondence and written notes.


This is a good point. I agree that the difference between the 'printed' and 'written' form of Arabic is much larger than for latin scripts and I didn't realize how confusing it would be for someone not used to it. Thanks for pointing it out.

I have planned a video on 'variations' of the joined forms and will probably do one that compares the printed and written forms.

Salman

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#72 Ghost Plane

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 17:35

Confusing is an understatement. I look at the joined forms and I'm still lost where one letter begins and another begins :embarrassed_smile:

#73 Linsolv

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 20:04

Confusing is an understatement. I look at the joined forms and I'm still lost where one letter begins and another begins :embarrassed_smile:


That can happen sometimes, yeah. But once you learn to recognize the forms, you shouldn't have TOO big a problem with it. It's just a matter of recognizing where a letter begins. Only the hand-written siin is "no letter" and just a baseline, and sometimes that can lead to confusion for people who don't automatically know what the word means (say, second-semester Arabic students, or people who don't speak Arabic at all). Otherwise, keep trying to look at Arabic letters and breaking down which ones are where, and so on, and it will come with time.

#74 94Terp

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 20:48

Shukrahn for the comments. My first semester of MSA was done entirely online, and focused on the letters and a little sentence structure. Most of the assignments were turned in using an Arabic keyboard... I can imagine the prof trying to grade 2 sections of 1st semester students. Next semster focuses more on writing and language skills, so I'm certain I'll need to get away from the "textbook" letter formation.

Edited by 94Terp, 24 December 2012 - 20:54.

<My avatar is an example of Bismallah (Islamic) caligraphy, that says "In the name of Allah, Most Merciful, Most Gracious". As a side note, I am neither Islamic, nor particularly religious. I just think it's really cool.>

#75 Linsolv

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 21:30

Ah, that would explain it. Handwriting practice (just like in English, how about that!) is key to having good handwriting. :P Good luck with S2! That's where I stumbled. Went back to S1 to work on my studying habits and came out of it with a whole new understanding of ruq'ah handwriting. Sometimes you get lucky I guess.

#76 zemof

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Posted 25 December 2012 - 14:12

Saw the topic and presumed it was about arabic calligraphy...haha

I am a student of Chinese calligraphy and self-taught/self-learning at Western calligraphy, with just a couple months of arabic calligraphy. Interestingly, I just came back from an exhibition Islamic Arts From Southeast Asia (Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore). Was at first disappointed that the so-called illuminated Qu'rans which was a far cry from those I've seen at the National Museum of India, until a different section focused on calligraphy just got my fan-girl mood turned to the MAX. Posted Image Other than appreciating, all I could recognise are alifs and baas hahaha...!




#77 smk

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Posted 25 December 2012 - 17:12

I started a topic on learning Arabic Calligraphy (Naskh) but didn't find any takers :-) This topic was started as a response to some requests for help in learning how to write.

What hands are you learning? Arabic Calligraphy is tough to pick up without guidance, it takes a while to understand the nuances of each script - a process made much easier with the guidance from a teacher. I have been learning pretty much on my own for the past few years - I'm sure with proper guidance I would have mastered at least one style by now.

Salman

Edited by smk, 26 December 2012 - 17:10.
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#78 Ghost Plane

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 16:48

Oops! Been off line due to real world and ISP provider coming this afternoon to put the magic smoke back into the equipment, so I probably missed a lot. Didn't see the post. :embarrassed_smile:

#79 AD356

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 18:51

http://www.fountainp...81-mj-alhabeeb/

Here is a new topic showing off M.J. Alhabeeb and is a great place to see the different scripts that you have been talking about on this topic.
-Alan

#80 johnmetta

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 09:27

This is for people who have shown an interest in learning how to write Arabic.


Wow, I was just going to ask about this, and then found the thread right away. This is great. I studied Arabic a little while serving in Desert Storm and really enjoyed it. I've since forgotten everything except how to write some of the numbers (almost all, I think).

#81 smk

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 10:53

It's great to know this is useful to you.

Interestingly the numerals Arabs use are actually Indian in origin - what was originally the Arabic numerals (developed in Iraq) are what we know, and use, as the European numerals now.

Please do upload your practice sheets for feedback and further instruction if you want.

Salman

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#82 Inkheart

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 17:57

I love this thread, and the time you've made to contribute all this information!

I took a term of Arabic this past autumn, and was enrolled in the next level for winter term. Unfortunately, it was canceled due to low enrollment. But my time was well spent as I was thoroughly drilled on writing and correctly connecting letters. Now I am on my own and progressing with a course ordered from Amazon. So glad I have the good grounding in writing though; it's making things much simpler for me.

I am marking this thread as I'm sure I'll be returning to it as a reference tool.

Thanks so much!
~April


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see a fine picture, and, if it were possible, to speak a few reasonable words.

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#83 smk

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 18:23

April - thank you for the kind message.

I'm sure you are well past the basics covered in these lessons but feel free to ask for help with writing if you ever need it.

Salman

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#84 Inkheart

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 00:53

Thank you kindly, Salman. :)
~April


One ought, every day at least, to hear a little song, read a good poem,
see a fine picture, and, if it were possible, to speak a few reasonable words.

~Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

#85 Santak

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 21:13

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#86 madzaxmax

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 03:08

Bhai, thank you so much. I am from Punjab (East). We use a lot of Urdu words in our daily language, but I suppose you already know that. Our 10th Guru, Shri Gobind Singh used to write poetry in Persian, and I have always wanted to learn the script and language.

I understand Persian and Arabic are different, but the script is very similar. With your help, I plan to "set my hand", in the writing style. Arabic forst, and who knows, maybe Persian next.

Thank you again.
Inglourious Basterds...

#87 smk

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:04

Santak - thank you for sharing this writing. What a lovey ink color.

I'm not sure if you are looking for feedback but I will share a couple of things that stand out for the possible benefit of others who read this.

Overall, the writing is quite clear and easily understood. There are a couple of places that might trip up a reader not familiar with the verses. I'll list them below:

1 and 1-a: The last meem on the first line should be written under the line rather than above it. This is how a 'faa' would be written (albeit with a dot.) You see the same in the last meem of 'Bism' at 1-a. The two 'min's in verses 3 and 6 have the same issue.

2: The 'baa+raa' in 'bi-rabbe' in the first verse on line 2 is a strange construction when used in handwriting. It seems like you are attempting to emulate the Naskh script which doesn't work in this case.

3: This 'sheen+raa' combination is not wrong per se but it is confusing as the shapes are too similar to a 'sheen'. This is because of the relative proportion of the 'raa' and the bowls of the 'seen'.

4: There should be a notch after the 'Saad' in 'Sudoor'.

5: There are two issues with 'Jinnate' in the last verse. The first one is easy, you missed the dot under the 'jeem'. You should have a notch for the 'noon' under the dot.

Posted Image

I'm sure these points are there mainly because you are copying a calligraphic style which doesn't always translate well into handwriting. You pen control is quite nice and all the letters in their various forms are clearly written.

Salman

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#88 smk

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:11

Bhai, thank you so much. I am from Punjab (East). We use a lot of Urdu words in our daily language, but I suppose you already know that. Our 10th Guru, Shri Gobind Singh used to write poetry in Persian, and I have always wanted to learn the script and language.

I understand Persian and Arabic are different, but the script is very similar. With your help, I plan to "set my hand", in the writing style. Arabic forst, and who knows, maybe Persian next.

Thank you again.


You are most welcome. I'm glad people are finding these tips useful.

I know a little Punjabi having lived in Punjab (in Pakistan) for a couple of years when quite young.

Persian and Arabic scripts are identical (except Persian has a one or two more letters and Urdu has another couple more than Persian). Learn to write one and you can write Arabic, Persian and Urdu (and to a certain degree Pushto but some letters are drawn differently).

Persian is a lovely language. I can write and read it but can't always pronounce it properly and understanding it is another matter altogether. It's a language I long to learn to a degree to be able to understand the works of Hafiz, Saadi, Iqbal and Rumi to mention a few of the greats.

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#89 Santak

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 18:39

Santak - thank you for sharing this writing. What a lovey ink color.

I'm not sure if you are looking for feedback but I will share a couple of things that stand out for the possible benefit of others who read this.

Overall, the writing is quite clear and easily understood. There are a couple of places that might trip up a reader not familiar with the verses. I'll list them below:

1 and 1-a: The last meem on the first line should be written under the line rather than above it. This is how a 'faa' would be written (albeit with a dot.) You see the same in the last meem of 'Bism' at 1-a. The two 'min's in verses 3 and 6 have the same issue.

2: The 'baa+raa' in 'bi-rabbe' in the first verse on line 2 is a strange construction when used in handwriting. It seems like you are attempting to emulate the Naskh script which doesn't work in this case.

3: This 'sheen+raa' combination is not wrong per se but it is confusing as the shapes are too similar to a 'sheen'. This is because of the relative proportion of the 'raa' and the bowls of the 'seen'.

4: There should be a notch after the 'Saad' in 'Sudoor'.

5: There are two issues with 'Jinnate' in the last verse. The first one is easy, you missed the dot under the 'jeem'. You should have a notch for the 'noon' under the dot.

Posted Image

I'm sure these points are there mainly because you are copying a calligraphic style which doesn't always translate well into handwriting. You pen control is quite nice and all the letters in their various forms are clearly written.

Salman

Thank you for appreciating.
I adore to write Arabic scripture, despite I cannot read, write and speak Arabic. I copy only. Among eastern languages I know only Turkish and Azeri, the others are western languages. The ink is my handmade saffron ink.

Edited by Santak, 09 March 2013 - 18:40.


#90 smk

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 02:03

Thank you for appreciating.
I adore to write Arabic scripture, despite I cannot read, write and speak Arabic. I copy only.


That is most impressive Santak. Arabic writing is difficult enough to reproduce for those who know the language. For you to write it out by just copying is just amazing.

Take a look at the videos in the first post if you would like to learn how to write Arabic. You don't need to know the language, I start with the basic alphabet and then how they connect to others.

Thank you for sharing.

Salman

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