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A Guide To Servicing A Sheaffer Triumph Vac Fill Fountain Pen...


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#1 grandmia

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 20:54



Hi all...Above is a video guide in servicing a Sheaffer Triumph Vac Fill fountain pen...I hope you find it informative...

#2 Ron Z

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 23:09

I'll review it more carefully again. But first comment - I do not recommend or condone the use of silicone grease non the nib threads. It does not give an adequate seal, and it makes it possible to over tighten the nib unit. Silicone grease is a lubricant, not a sealant. Bees wax or the tacky wax used for a toilet bowl sealing ring would be better if you can't or don't want to use a rosin based thread sealant.

Edited by Ron Z, 06 September 2012 - 23:24.

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#3 grandmia

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 08:01

I'll review it more carefully again. But first comment - I do not recommend or condone the use of silicone grease non the nib threads. It does not give an adequate seal, and it makes it possible to over tighten the nib unit. Silicone grease is a lubricant, not a sealant. Bees wax or the tacky wax used for a toilet bowl sealing ring would be better if you can't or don't want to use a rosin based thread sealant.

Hello Ron...I also use a modeling wax (see my Parker 65 service guide) for the nib threads.It all depends how tight the thread is when i am reinstalling the nib unit.The silicone grease works fine and makes the nib unit air tight.I think the over tightening of the nib depends on the person holding the nib and not necessarily the grease,wax or rosin that is applied.Unfortunately i do not have any rosin based sealant,therefore any donation would be kindly excepted...
Thank you for your comments...

Regards Stef.

#4 Ron Z

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 12:01

"Expected?" TANSTAFL

Edited by Ron Z, 07 September 2012 - 12:01.

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#5 Tom Heath

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 12:51

Well done easy to understand

please keep up the good work. I have viewed other u tube videos and appreciate your experiences and good camera work too
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#6 hari317

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 13:24

Very informative Stef. Thanks for making and sharing such top class videos.

Hari

#7 grandmia

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 15:59

"Expected?" TANSTAFL

Hi again Ron....Sorry but i do not understand your reply ? What do you mean by "Expected" TANSTAFL ?

Thanks Stef.

#8 grandmia

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 16:00

Well done easy to understand

please keep up the good work. I have viewed other u tube videos and appreciate your experiences and good camera work too
Tom Heath

Hi Tom...Im glad you have enjoyed the video....Thanks Stef.

#9 grandmia

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 16:02

Very informative Stef. Thanks for making and sharing such top class videos.

Hari

Hi Hari...Glad you find it informative and i hope it helps you....Thanks Stef.

#10 mrcharlie

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 17:14

"Expected?" TANSTAFL

Hi again Ron....Sorry but i do not understand your reply ? What do you mean by "Expected" TANSTAFL ?

You typed "excepted". I think Ron is guessing you meant Expected, and his reply means "There Ain't No Such Thing As Free Lunch".

I believe you misspelled "accepted", not "expected".

#11 Ray-Vigo

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 17:40

Silicone grease has the advantage of making the nib easier to twist off later if you have to do later work, which is nice. The problem is, as Ron says, it is a lubricant and not a sealant, and may actually facilitate the nib twisting itself off the mount at the wrong time. The sealing effect of the silicone grease is simply that it is a sludge that is squeezed into the gaps in the threads. The sealant will do that plus accomplish other work and hold fast to the gaps. The rosin-based heat release sealant is the way to go. It holds the part fast at normal temperature but when heated with a standard heat gun, melts away and leaves the threads workable for getting the nib off. The grease may work in a pinch with nothing else on hand, but I don't think it is much of a long-term or correct solution. I bought a small container of the sealant awhile back and it has replaced everything else for me in terms of sealing up the threads on vac fills, touchdowns, and snorkels.

Edited by Ray-Vigo, 07 September 2012 - 17:43.


#12 grandmia

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 18:24

"Expected?" TANSTAFL

Hi again Ron....Sorry but i do not understand your reply ? What do you mean by "Expected" TANSTAFL ?

You typed "excepted". I think Ron is guessing you meant Expected, and his reply means "There Ain't No Such Thing As Free Lunch".

I believe you misspelled "accepted", not "expected".

Hi...I think it depends who you ask for that free lunch.I have sent free bottles of shellac to members at no cost to them,and i paid the P&P costs to.I am more than happy to help other pen enthusiast were i can.Here in the UK i deal with lots of pen people who are more than happy to supply a needed part or a little advice free of charge as they know the favour will be returned.I think it is great that pen enthusiast help each other.I guess some people are in it for the money and some are more than happy to help.....

Thanks Stef.

#13 grandmia

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 18:37

Silicone grease has the advantage of making the nib easier to twist off later if you have to do later work, which is nice. The problem is, as Ron says, it is a lubricant and not a sealant, and may actually facilitate the nib twisting itself off the mount at the wrong time. The sealing effect of the silicone grease is simply that it is a sludge that is squeezed into the gaps in the threads. The sealant will do that plus accomplish other work and hold fast to the gaps. The rosin-based heat release sealant is the way to go. It holds the part fast at normal temperature but when heated with a standard heat gun, melts away and leaves the threads workable for getting the nib off. The grease may work in a pinch with nothing else on hand, but I don't think it is much of a long-term or correct solution. I bought a small container of the sealant awhile back and it has replaced everything else for me in terms of sealing up the threads on vac fills, touchdowns, and snorkels.

Hi...I am aware of the properties of silicone grease.On this pen i made the decision to use the grease rather than my modeling wax because of how tight the nib section was.The nib on this pen is not twisting anywhere,believe me.Some people use only rosin based sealant i know,but there are other alternatives if you do not have rosin.I made enquiries with a couple of renown repair men here in the UK who have no qualms using the same method,therefore if it is good enough for them then its fine by me.
Thank you for your input.
Regards Stef.

#14 Ron Z

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 20:22

You know Stef, this isn't a hobby. I earn my bread and butter repairing pens, and invest a lot of time here and elsewhere answering questions. Happy to do it, but it's more for the love of pens than the money. I don't make a heck of a lot selling thread sealant. It takes time to do, and there are out of pocket expenses for packaging and materials. But I'm happy to make it available to folks so that they can use the right materials when they repair their pens.

A small jar is $12, maybe $13 USD to the UK including P&P (that's what, 6 GBP?). The price of a couple of pints of beer in the UK. If that's a stretch for you and you really are interested in using it, I'll send you one.

Edited by Ron Z, 07 September 2012 - 20:47.

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#15 framebaer

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 21:09

Silicone grease has the advantage of making the nib easier to twist off later if you have to do later work, which is nice. The problem is, as Ron says, it is a lubricant and not a sealant, and may actually facilitate the nib twisting itself off the mount at the wrong time. The sealing effect of the silicone grease is simply that it is a sludge that is squeezed into the gaps in the threads. The sealant will do that plus accomplish other work and hold fast to the gaps. The rosin-based heat release sealant is the way to go. It holds the part fast at normal temperature but when heated with a standard heat gun, melts away and leaves the threads workable for getting the nib off. The grease may work in a pinch with nothing else on hand, but I don't think it is much of a long-term or correct solution. I bought a small container of the sealant awhile back and it has replaced everything else for me in terms of sealing up the threads on vac fills, touchdowns, and snorkels.

Hi...I am aware of the properties of silicone grease.On this pen i made the decision to use the grease rather than my modeling wax because of how tight the nib section was.The nib on this pen is not twisting anywhere,believe me.Some people use only rosin based sealant i know,but there are other alternatives if you do not have rosin.I made enquiries with a couple of renown repair men here in the UK who have no qualms using the same method,therefore if it is good enough for them then its fine by me.
Thank you for your input.
Regards Stef.


Ah yes, time for me to once again chime in here. Again for the 1000th time, silicone grease getting anywhere into the capillary path will render the nib at best a "skipper" and at worst completely non-flowing. Now the careful experienced chaps may be able to successfully apply the silicone to ONLY the threads but the chance that the hamfisted Newbie will get some in the wrong place is probably rather high.

" Hey how come I followed Grandmia's video and now my pen won't write at all?"
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#16 grandmia

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 22:16

You know Stef, this isn't a hobby. I earn my bread and butter repairing pens, and invest a lot of time here and elsewhere answering questions. Happy to do it, but it's more for the love of pens than the money. I don't make a heck of a lot selling thread sealant. It takes time to do, and there are out of pocket expenses for packaging and materials. But I'm happy to make it available to folks so that they can use the right materials when they repair their pens.

A small jar is $12, maybe $13 USD to the UK including P&P (that's what, 6 GBP?). The price of a couple of pints of beer in the UK. If that's a stretch for you and you really are interested in using it, I'll send you one.

Hi Ron...I am also trying to earn my bread and butter,but unfortunately my good nature takes over and i end up sending items at my own cost and undercharging for repairs.I must be going soft.
Thanks for the offer to purchase your thread sealant,but im sure one of my contacts here in the UK will supply me with some.

Thanks again Stef.

#17 grandmia

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 22:23

Silicone grease has the advantage of making the nib easier to twist off later if you have to do later work, which is nice. The problem is, as Ron says, it is a lubricant and not a sealant, and may actually facilitate the nib twisting itself off the mount at the wrong time. The sealing effect of the silicone grease is simply that it is a sludge that is squeezed into the gaps in the threads. The sealant will do that plus accomplish other work and hold fast to the gaps. The rosin-based heat release sealant is the way to go. It holds the part fast at normal temperature but when heated with a standard heat gun, melts away and leaves the threads workable for getting the nib off. The grease may work in a pinch with nothing else on hand, but I don't think it is much of a long-term or correct solution. I bought a small container of the sealant awhile back and it has replaced everything else for me in terms of sealing up the threads on vac fills, touchdowns, and snorkels.

Hi...I am aware of the properties of silicone grease.On this pen i made the decision to use the grease rather than my modeling wax because of how tight the nib section was.The nib on this pen is not twisting anywhere,believe me.Some people use only rosin based sealant i know,but there are other alternatives if you do not have rosin.I made enquiries with a couple of renown repair men here in the UK who have no qualms using the same method,therefore if it is good enough for them then its fine by me.
Thank you for your input.
Regards Stef.


Ah yes, time for me to once again chime in here. Again for the 1000th time, silicone grease getting anywhere into the capillary path will render the nib at best a "skipper" and at worst completely non-flowing. Now the careful experienced chaps may be able to successfully apply the silicone to ONLY the threads but the chance that the hamfisted Newbie will get some in the wrong place is probably rather high.

" Hey how come I followed Grandmia's video and now my pen won't write at all?"

Well gentlemen that didn't take long ! I will refrain from commenting on this occasion.
Have a great day Stef.

#18 OcalaFlGuy

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 02:14

Hey Stef,

A question if I might.

I've noticed that it's not unusual for you to sell on your website, pens you have "restored".

I'm curious what your warranty/return policy is for the pens you sell. I was unable to find any note of either on your Services or For Sale pages. Perhaps I just missed it.

As confident as you are in your procedures, I can't possibly imagine why you wouldn't stand fully behind all your work. :thumbup:

Bruce in Ocala, FL

#19 SheWrites

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 10:37

http://youtu.be/HmF0CnazNK4

Hi all...Above is a video guide in servicing a Sheaffer Triumph Vac Fill fountain pen...I hope you find it informative...


For myself, I think it would be infinitely more educational to actually see you dismantle the pen on camera, as I am certain that is where MY first problems would arise. You spent a great deal of time talking about what the perils of doing it incorrectly could be, but you did not even one time say which direction the threads turn to remove the nib. THAT I would have found more helpful than the discussion of the pen's coloration or the style of the nib. I am also more than a little leery of covering everything with shellac to make it stay in place, or using silicone grease as a sealant. I have purchased more than one pen touted as "fully restored" only to find that the restoration was not done as neatly or correctly as it could have been and that there is now shellac gumming up the feed or parts that have been cemented together for all eternity with shellac. Any pen that I buy must come with a full warranty or it had better be extremely inexpensive. If I were to do my own sac or filler repair or "restoration" I would not want to have it glued together making it impossible for a qualified repair person to disassemble it and do it right if the need arose. Like I said - these are only my opinions, and not being a repair person I am not criticizing your choices, only explaining how I view them as a potential pen buyer. Thank you for the information in the video that I was able to tuck away for future reference - I am sure that they (the videos) are quite time consuming to make.

You have the right to remain silent.  Anything you say will be misquoted, then used against you.

#20 grandmia

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 12:24

Hey Stef,

A question if I might.

I've noticed that it's not unusual for you to sell on your website, pens you have "restored".

I'm curious what your warranty/return policy is for the pens you sell. I was unable to find any note of either on your Services or For Sale pages. Perhaps I just missed it.

As confident as you are in your procedures, I can't possibly imagine why you wouldn't stand fully behind all your work. :thumbup:

Bruce in Ocala, FL

Hello Bruce...
This reply is a little nicer than the last one,therefore i am more than happy to answer your question.
The web site is in effect still being constructed when i can find the time to update,so it is still in a very early stage.There is no details regarding warranty/return policies.
Every pen that i sell is followed up with a contact and should there be a problem then a full refund is not a problem.Of the 1000s of pens i have sold i have had only one request to return the pen from a doctor in Germany who wanted the ink flow adjusting,the pen was returned back to him at my own cost.
All my pens are restored to a level that i would expect to receive them my self.Unless there are any issues then they are mentioned in the description.
Thanks
Stef.




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