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Montefiore Pens


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#1 Quackedo

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 18:04

Just bought a Montefiore Chatham Mocha with a cool 2 tone nib.

Does anyone have any experience with them?

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Edited by Quackedo, 05 September 2012 - 18:07.

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#2 jar

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 18:25

IIRC they are rebranded Jinhao pens.

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#3 Quackedo

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 00:34

I Just found this on another website:fountainpensguide.com


"The History of Montefiore Fountain Pens


The Long Island town of Westbury, NY has long since been home to many businesses. One such company that originates from this small middle class neighborhood is Montefoire Writing Instruments. While somewhat innocuous on the surface, this company has produced some truly brilliant fountain pen designs.

Montefiore Pens are quite new in comparison to other pen companies on the global market. These pens on just debuted on the world market in 1996. They did, however, make quite the impression as the visual allure of the pens was (and is) stunning.

Best of all, the pens are promote themselves to be inexpensive which is an added benefit to those seeking collectible and functional pens.

Let the truth be told: even though Montefiore Fountain Pens are relatively new to the writing instrument industry, they have the potential to be major names for decades to come."


So, how are they Re-branded Jinhao's? Where are they actually made? They seem to be designed in NY, but possibly manufactured elsewhere?

Edited by Quackedo, 06 September 2012 - 16:56.

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#4 jar

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 00:38

I Just found this on another website:fountainpensguide.com


"The History of Montefiore Fountain Pens


The Long Island town of Westbury, NY has long since been home to many businesses. One such company that originates from this small middle class neighborhood is Montefoire Writing Instruments. While somewhat innocuous on the surface, this company has produced some truly brilliant fountain pen designs.

Montefiore Pens are quite new in comparison to other pen companies on the global market. These pens on just debuted on the world market in 1996. They did, however, make quite the impression as the visual allure of the pens was (and is) stunning.

Best of all, the pens are promote themselves to be inexpensive which is an added benefit to those seeking collectible and functional pens.

Let the truth be told: even though Montefiore Fountain Pens are relatively new to the writing instrument industry, they have the potential to be major names for decades to come."


So, how are they Re-branded Jinhao's? Where are the actually made? They seem to be designed in NY, but possibly manufactured elsewhere?


Go take a look at the Jinhao pens.

How pierceful grows the hazy yon! How myrtle petaled thou! For spring hath sprung the cyclotron - How high browse thou, brown cow? -- Churchy LaFemme, 1950

Anyone so limited that they can only spell a word one way suffers a severe handicap. -- jar

The last pen I bought will be the next to last pen I ever buy! --jar


#5 Quackedo

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 01:26

OK, I went to hisnibs website and looked at every pen they list for Jinhao. I also did a Jinhao search on Google images for a similar Jinhao to a Montefiore Chatham and I can't find one with the same or even similar cap clip. I am starting to think that re-branding may not be totally correct and that Montefiore-a NY based company-has designed some pens and has done what so many other companies in this country have done-farmed out the manufacture to the Chinese Company that makes Jinhao. I think that the German nib used is the same or similar to the X750 two toned nib which is actually quite a nice writer.

Eventually we may have a similar situation to cars ie.

Feed made in Switzerland, nib made in Germany, barrel made in China, colored in Japan, converter made in India, and assembled in Mexico, based on a US design. A french Pen. Ink would be from Spain of Course (wait, do they even make ink in Spain?).

Edited by Quackedo, 06 September 2012 - 01:30.

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#6 AltecGreen

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 01:55

I think that the German nib used is the same or similar to the X750 two toned nib which is actually quite a nice writer.



Just some information for you to file away later.


Nibs marked Iridium Point Germany do not have to be made in Germany. In fact, the nib was most likely made in China. The term Iridium Point Germany means that the 'iridium' used to tip the nib was made in Germany (most likely produced by Heraeus). This is all that is required by law for the nib to be so marked. In fact, it is not clear if even the tipping is from Germany. On another point, 'iridium' tipping actually contains very little iridium.

Edited by AltecGreen, 06 September 2012 - 01:55.

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#7 Jerome Tarshis

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 09:52

The so-called history of Montefiore was obviously not written by a native speaker of English. Nor by a person with much knowledge of Long Island, and possibly not of towns. Westbury is an upscale suburb in a rather upscale part of Long Island. That isn't an obscure fact. To describe a town or village as a small middle-class neighborhood seems painfully unworldly.

Granted, that text did not originate with the company, unless maybe it did. I'd like to think the company wouldn't misspell its own name in the second line of its own publicity materials.

As I write this, I haven't tried to find Montefiore's own Web page. If there isn't one, that is suggestive, although it says nothing against the smoothness of the OP's nib. Whether any part of the nib originated in Germany is an open question in my mind, as suggested by AltecGreen above. To say German origin of the tipping material is "required" is not to say that that is the way the world actually works.

Edited by Jerome Tarshis, 06 September 2012 - 09:55.


#8 Quackedo

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 17:09

Wow, it's worse than I thought. The "History" quote was from fountainpensguide.com. The actual Montefiore web site is http://www.montefiorepens.com (turn your volume down loud music embedded!) and of course they say nothing about where the pens are made. They do however take credit for the designs they sell. I'm guessing they design a pen on paper and then have it manufactured elsewhere (Jinhao?). Probably China at any rate.


Quote from Montefiore Website:


"About MontefioreElegant pens at affordable prices.

When we crafted our first pen fourteen years ago, it was the culmination of a dream. We believed that everyone, not just the wealthy, should be able to enjoy a little luxury. And that first pen embodied everything that has become our mission today. Unique form, beauty and elegance. Real function for everyday life. And affordability, the best for less than you'd expect.

We've grown, and now we offer scores of styles. We keep our prices low because we sell only through GiftValues.com and special mail and phone promotions with prominent retailers. We invite you to compare the quality and styling of any of our pens with those big name pens costing many, many times our prices.

That very first pen we sold in 1996 was our "Classic", the perfect beginning of a dream business, because we've sold many hundreds of thousands of them as we grew. "Classic" is now an expanded line of its own, including our "Classic Equinox" in 24kt gold-plate or fine silver-plate. Take a look. You'll see what we mean by elegance at a great price. "



I'll know more when the pens get here in a few days. Keep you posted.

Edited by Quackedo, 06 September 2012 - 17:12.

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#9 Quackedo

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 20:28

OK, the infamous Montefiore Chatham is here.
It seems to be a very nice pen. If I didn't know that it cost less than $10.00 (with shipping) I could easily be fooled into believing it costs $300.00 to $500.00. It is large, heavy, has a nice two-toned nib, and writes very nicely. Very smooth without a hiccup (hiccough).
I have purchased some pens by the "Big" makers (Sailor, Montblanc, Waterman, etc) and to be honest, I like this pen better than some of them.

If "name" didn't enter the equation, I would pick this pen as my everyday writer over many of them. I like the heft, feel in my hand, and the way it glides on my Rhodia paper.
So, I have to ask (hopefully without offending anyone), Why is my Sailor 1911 better than this pen? I'm assuming that the build and the quality of the materials is better . Will my Sailor last longer or be a more consistant writer?

Frankly, I have bought several vintage pens and I am not too in love with the way they feel and write but I like them for their history.

If I went through my entire collection blindfolded, and picked out the best ten pens with no idea which was which, I wonder what I would choose?

Hmmmm....
"There is an element of truth in all humor." I wonder if that's true?
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#10 CravenMoorehead

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:48

Greetings everybody!  I too, have a Montefiore Chatham FP... it is actually the reason I joined this forum.  Since I got it as a gift, I have had trouble getting it to write properly.  Ink flow just stops mid stroke.  I am convinced that the nib and reservoir are faulty.  I have learned the following in attempting to remedy the problem... One, Montefiore pens are sold through giftvalues dot com.  They don't have much in terms of nibs and parts to fix problems.  Second, to get any real answers, you have to call a different number than that listed at their main web site, which goes to Smithsonian something... nice people, but again, they can't send out parts or anything. 

 

The pen itself is nice. Brass barrel and cap, beautiful paint exterior, very solid pen.  If I knew of a place here that repaired fountain pens, it would probably be my go to pen. 

 

Anyone know of repair places in the metro Detroit area?  Looking for them has become the proverbial search for a needle in a haystack.


Skulking outside the asylum walls!  :thumbup: