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#1 Sandy1

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 11:17

Hi,

Some Members were not so pleased that the beautiful medium Blue-Black of freshly written ESSRI shifted to a very dark Blue-Black as the ink oxidised and reacted with constituents of the paper over time. Consequently, there arose a perceived need (aka curiosity) to prepare these samples to determine if a greater Blue aspect could be generated from a mix, rather than [endlessly] seeking a pen+paper pairing that would reliably give the desired result. i.e. "Put the Blue back in Blue-Black".

As a preliminary undertaking, samples of ESSRI diluted with distilled water were generated, and posted in the Ink Comparisons, Scans & Tests sub-Forum: LINK http://www.fountainp...s-ink-dulution/
Those should also serve as a starting point for those who like the colour of ESSRI as it comes, but find the density too high with a given pen+paper combo.

As mixing can have quite unpredictable results, one should proceed with all due diligence, vigilance, PPE and a sense of humour. That goes at least double for mixing with inks with an iron-gall component.

Though ink mixing can be rewarding, it can also be a phenomenal time-waster. That goes at least treble for mixing with ESSRI, which seems to require waiting ten days or so for the ink to 'cure'.

These are initial trials that I thought were OK to briefly load into an expendable pen, promptly prepare the samples, then immediately give the pen a thorough wash in a solution of 10% unscented household ammonia + surfactant. No hanging about or composing haiku with a trial mix. (I doubt the Sahara would ever see a mixed ink.)

I do not suggest that the following sample mixes are 'guaranteed' or 'safe' in any way whatsoever. Sauf qui peut.

To off-set the density gain of stock ESSRI, hence 'submerging' of the Blue aspect, mixes included various amounts of water.

All recipes were acceptable in terms of writing experience.
There were no problems with bleed- show-through.

- - -


RECIPES:

Units of measure are volumetric units - eyedropper drips.

-0- : ESSRI Stock
-1- : (4 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 1 Aurora Blue
-2- : (8 ESSRI + 2 Water) + 1 Pelikan Edelstein Topaz
-3- : (3 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 5 Rohrer & Klingner Verdigris
-4- : (8 ESSRI + 2 Water) + 1 Montblanc Royal Blue
-5- : (8 ESSRI + 2 Water) + 1 Parker Quink Blue-Black (Actually a Dark Blue.)
-6- : (1 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 1 Herbin Bleu Azure
-7- : (1 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 1 Pelikan 4001 Turquoise
-8- : (1 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 1 Noodler's Ottoman Azure


= - = - =

For convenient viewing of the images, you may wish to scroll to the menu at the very bottom of this window, then change the FPN Theme to 'IP.Board Mobile'.

Please take a moment to adjust your gear to accurately depict the Grey Scale below.
As the patches are neutral grey, that is what you should see.

Mac http://www.wikihow.c...te-Your-Monitor
Wintel PC http://www.calibrize.com/

Grey Scale.
Posted Image

WRITTEN SAMPLES - Moby Dick
Ruling: 8mm.

Note: Ten to twelve days elapsed from writing the samples to scanning.

Figure 1.
Paper: HPJ1124
-0- : ESSRI as it comes.
Posted Image

Figure 2.
Paper: HPJ1124
-1- . (4 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 1 Aurora Blue
Posted Image


Figure 3.
Paper: HPJ1124
-2- . (8 ESSRI + 2 Water) + 1 Pelikan Edelstein Topaz
Posted Image

Figure 4.
Paper: HPJ1124
-3- . (3 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 5 Rohrer & Klingner Verdigris
Posted Image


Figure 5.
Paper: HPJ1124
-4- . (8 ESSRI + 2 Water) + 1 Montblanc Royal Blue
Posted Image

Figure 6.
Paper: HPJ1124
-5- . (8 ESSRI + 2 Water) + 1 Parker Quink Blue-Black (Actually a Dark Blue.)
Posted Image


Figure 7.
Paper: HPJ1124
-6- . (1 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 1 Herbin Bleu Azure
Posted Image


Figure 8.
Paper: HPJ1124
-7- . (1 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 1 Pelikan 4001 Turquoise
Posted Image


Figure 9.
Paper: HPJ1124
-8- . (1 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 1 Noodler's Ottoman Azure.
Posted Image

  • Recipes 6, 7 & 8 on Rhodia:

Figure 10.
Paper: Rhodia
-6- . (1 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 1 Herbin Bleu Azure
Posted Image

Figure 11.
Paper: Rhodia
-7- . (1 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 1 Pelikan 4001 Turquoise
Posted Image


Figure 12.
Paper: Rhodia
-8- . (1 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 1 Noodler's Ottoman Azure.
Posted Image

  • Recipes 6, 7 & 8 on Staples 20 lb:

Figure 13.
Paper: Staples 20 lb.
-6- . (1 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 1 Herbin Bleu Azure
Posted Image


Figure 14.
Paper: Staples 20 lb.
-7- . (1 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 1 Pelikan 4001 Turquoise
Posted Image


Figure 15.
Paper: Staples 20 lb.
-8- . (1 ESSRI + 1 Water) + 1 Noodler's Ottoman Azure.
Posted Image



FULL SHEETS:
Written Samples, Swabs, Smear/Dry Times & Wet Tests.


Figure 16.
Recipes 1 & 2 on HPJ1124.
Posted Image


Figure 17.
Recipes 3, 4, & 5 on HPJ1124.
Posted Image


Figure 18.
Recipes 6, 7, & 8 on HPJ1124.
Posted Image


Figure 19.
Recipes 6, 7, & 8 on Rhodia.
Posted Image


Figure 20.
Recipes 6, 7, & 8 on Staples 20 lb.
Posted Image



= = = = = =

NUTS & BOLTS

Links:
______

Pen: Rosetta Magellan + Schmidt g-p steel nib.
______

Papers:
  • HPJ1124 - 24lb. Laser Copy.
  • Rhodia.
  • Staples 20lb multi use.
______

Images:
  • Scans were made on an Epson V600 scanner; factory defaults were accepted.
  • Written Samples were scanned at 200 dpi & 24 bit colour.
  • Scans were not adjusted, other than dumb-down by Photobouquet and IP.Board.
______

Fine Print:

As always, YMMV; not only from materials, methods, environment, etc., but also due to differences between the stuff I used, and that you may have.
Also, I entrust readers to separate opinion from fact; to evaluate inferences and conclusions as to their merit; and to be amused by whatever tickles your fancy.


-30-

TAGS: Fountain pen ink mix recipe ESSRI Ecclesiastical Stationery Supplies Registrars Ink Sandy1

Edited by Sandy1, 18 January 2012 - 17:20.

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#2 UDog

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 04:10

The work you have done Sandy1 is simply astounding. At least for me, I like ESSRI just as it is. However, I do like your No.8 mixture. I might give it a try myself. Thank you for your effort and your tenacity.

#3 Sandy1

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 00:42

The work you have done Sandy1 is simply astounding. At least for me, I like ESSRI just as it is. However, I do like your No.8 mixture. I might give it a try myself. Thank you for your effort and your tenacity.

Hi,

You're welcome! And thanks for the compliment!

At the instigation of Messmer,
http://www.fountainp...ost__p__2235518, a mix using a bulletproof ink was also done.

Recipe -9- is a bit pale for general use, but its a trial run with an encouraging result. More choices, yes?

None of the ESSRI recipes are guaranteed to be 'safe'!

Bye,
S1



Posted Image

Posted Image

Edited by Sandy1, 02 February 2012 - 00:52.

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#4 RobbW

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 18:17

Sandy, is the ESSRI Ottoman's Azure as amazing in person as it looks on screen? It really stands out on my laptop screen on white and ivory paper. Is it close to Noodler's Manhattan Blue or Iroshizuku Tsuki Yo?

Thanks for all your work, I have a sample of Ottoman and think I'll go ahead and purchase ESSRI.

#5 Sandy1

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 09:43

Sandy, is the ESSRI Ottoman's Azure as amazing in person as it looks on screen? It really stands out on my laptop screen on white and ivory paper. Is it close to Noodler's Manhattan Blue or Iroshizuku Tsuki Yo?

Thanks for all your work, I have a sample of Ottoman and think I'll go ahead and purchase ESSRI.

Hi,

Mix -8- does look like an interesting avenue of pursuit for those who like dark inks with a bit of something extra.

As for its similarity to the other inks, well, I'll leave that to you. B)

ESSRI is not a simple highly predictable ink. It was aptly described as 'sneaky' by BoBo Olson. LINK http://www.fountainp...ost__p__2189962

If you decide to purchase some ESSRI, expect the unexpected.

EDIT- to add: Please see this Post re: pH of dyes/inks to mix with ESSRI. http://www.fountainp...ost__p__2237885
Problem being a dearth of current pH data available, but we have another usable aspect well-defined.

Bye,
S1

Some Swabs

Noodler's Manhattan Blue - Exclusively at Art Brown NYC USA:
Posted Image
ESSRI Recipe -8- appears on the even numbered rows, interlaced with NOA :
Posted Image
Pilot tsuki-yo:
Posted Image

Edited by Sandy1, 04 February 2012 - 11:05.

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#6 RobbW

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 02:46

Wow Sandy, you're fast and thorough! Thanks for the scans, they were a nice surprise. I didn't expect that level of response.

On my monitor, your ESSRI Mix #8 looks remarkably like Tsuki Yo. I'll get some and see how the shading and other characteristics compare. Your scans do a good job of picking out differences in color. In my pens, Manhattan Blue and Tsuki Yo look similar. Your scans show the differences well.

Thank you.

[font="Verdana"]Hi,

Mix -8- does look like an interesting avenue of pursuit for those who like dark inks with a bit of something extra.

As for its similarity to the other inks, well, I'll leave that to you. B)

ESSRI is not a simple highly predictable ink. It was aptly described as 'sneaky' by BoBo Olson. LINK http://www.fountainp...ost__p__2189962

If you decide to purchase some ESSRI, expect the unexpected.

EDIT- to add: Please see this Post re: pH of dyes/inks to mix with ESSRI. http://www.fountainp...ost__p__2237885
Problem being a dearth of current pH data available, but we have another usable aspect well-defined.

Bye,
S1




#7 drgoretex

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 17:26

Now THIS looks like fun. Cool inks that may yet be water-ummm-kind-of-resistant...ish. Well, at least will leave a readable line.

I do happen to have a few expendable pens to experiment with (and can make several more...), so I think I will have a go at some of this fun...

Ken

#8 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 15:39

Well I did like the Aurora blue mix...but have none. :headsmack:

It's real easy to like a mix with an ink you have like the Topaz. :rolleyes:

Semi-flex is an “almost” flex; not a ‘flex’ nib. It is great for regular writing. It can give you some fancy; but it is not made for real fancy writing. For that get a 'flexi' or a "flex" nib.

"

 

Wider than Normal does not exist. Wider than Japanese does. Every company has it's very own standard + slop/tolerance. Developed from the users of it's pens only; not the users of other companies pens. The size you grind a nib to, is your standard only. Paper and ink matter to nib width. Thank god for 1/2 sizes or it would be boring.


#9 Sandy1

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 15:24

Well I did like the Aurora blue mix...but have none. :headsmack:

It's real easy to like a mix with an ink you have like the Topaz. :rolleyes:


Hi,

I do encourage to try mixing with inks that one has to hand, just to do a 'proof of concept'.

So, if one has a Violet-Blue ink that is similar in colour to Aurora Blue, then that would be my next step. Ditto for a Turquoise: if I liked the mix with P4T, but only had Sheaffer Turquoise, I'd try the Sheaffer . . .

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#10 Jared

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 13:49

I recently purchased ESSRI and have been quite impressed with it. However, it can be hard-starting, so I hope to try a mix that will give it a higher degree of "lubricity." Will an ink with great flow characteristics bring those qualities to a mix? Any recommendations?

#11 Sandy1

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Posted 28 December 2012 - 15:14

I recently purchased ESSRI and have been quite impressed with it. However, it can be hard-starting, so I hope to try a mix that will give it a higher degree of "lubricity." Will an ink with great flow characteristics bring those qualities to a mix? Any recommendations?


Hi,

I've been using ESSRI on and off for a fair while in various pens. I have noticed the ink on the tip of the nib can become dry quite quickly, but the ink in the feed is ready to go. So one might 'nudge' the nib if the pen is left uncapped for too long during a writing session, but I've not found the need to dip the pen in water to prime the nib+feed. (When a Plumix + ESSRI is left capped for several days, it starts immediately.)

Lubricity is not related directly to the start-up: Lubricity comes into play primarily in the writing experience - how smooth the ink feels.

Start-up is more a matter of how the ink behaves (dry out) in a given pen. I've noticed that with the same ink, different pens of the same make model & nib can behave differently. :wacko:

Typically an ink with greater flow will also have greater lubricity: As there's more ink flowing, there's more liquid at the nib to paper interface. (Also influenced by the absorbency & texture of the paper.)

It might be the case that an ink with greater flow will leave lots of ink on the nib, so that it won't dry out as quickly, hence make for more reliable start-up.

Inks that comes to mind are Sailor Sky High for a pale ink, and the top-shelf Visconti Blue for a darker ink.

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#12 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 17:18

Japanese ink can cost €50 over here in Germany.
I had wanted that Noodler's Ottoman Azure as was...one of three Noodlers, I needed and stupidly did not have mailed to me when I was in the States this last spring; with the other two. Time can really fly.
It has been added to my short list of inks.
I do have a long list.
Aurora Blue has been added to my 'collection. It and Topaz seemed to 'add the blue'. MB even more...surprising was how nice Parker Quink Blue-Black was.


Even if they are no where near a blue black.
Then came the Pelikan Turquoise...that I have and will try out.
Ottoman Azure mix seems to be something real special.
Something more than I saw the last time I visited this thread.

Now I find out I can save €38 by ordering a bottle of expensive imported Noodlers (€12) and make a Japanese clone ink. :thumbup:


First I have a mix of Pelikan black & blue that I tried to make a blue-black ink with. I have added some ESSR and a bit of water to a bit in an inkwell.
Both with Easy Full Flex nibs.

:headsmack: The other pen only 'looked' clean, some sort of tiny remains of a green was in the piston chamber even if I didn't notice it. :blink:
It is black-tad of green to the other's 'blue' start, long wet too, compared to the uncontaminated ink.
It don't take much contamination to really make color's different.One dried to a 'black' fast, the other has remained 'blue' like the first couple of Sandy's samples.

The nib is so much better in that second pen; finer, more flexible even if they are both Degussas. Odd I'd not noticed it before.

Do you have to dilute with water????
Or why is a water dilution needed?

Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 04 April 2013 - 17:26.

Semi-flex is an “almost” flex; not a ‘flex’ nib. It is great for regular writing. It can give you some fancy; but it is not made for real fancy writing. For that get a 'flexi' or a "flex" nib.

"

 

Wider than Normal does not exist. Wider than Japanese does. Every company has it's very own standard + slop/tolerance. Developed from the users of it's pens only; not the users of other companies pens. The size you grind a nib to, is your standard only. Paper and ink matter to nib width. Thank god for 1/2 sizes or it would be boring.