Jump to content


Photo

Author Paul Theroux On Writing With A Pen


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Michael_V

Michael_V

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 42 posts

Posted 21 May 2012 - 03:20

Interesting recent article in the Wall Street Journal by author Paul Theroux on his preference for using a pen (Lamy) and Docket Diamond paper to write his manuscripts in longhand.

"Writing by hand is part of my creative process. The speed at which I write with a pen seems to be the speed at which my imagination finds the best forms of words."

http://online.wsj.co...ooks_LS_Books_5

#2 empyrean

empyrean

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 332 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 21 May 2012 - 03:28

Interesting recent article in the Wall Street Journal by author Paul Theroux on his preference for using a pen (Lamy) and Docket Diamond paper to write his manuscripts in longhand.

"Writing by hand is part of my creative process. The speed at which I write with a pen seems to be the speed at which my imagination finds the best forms of words."

http://online.wsj.co...ooks_LS_Books_5

Hear! Hear! Great article! I pull my thoughts together so much better with a fountain pen on paper. It may be the digital age, but I cringe when hearing how a new class in school will not use paper and pen, just ipads and text messages. But that's another thread.... :rolleyes:
empyrean Conklin,Stipula Pyrite, Bon Voyage & Tuscany Dreams Siena, Levengers, Sailor 1911,Pelikan M200, Bexley BX802, AoLiWen Music Notes pen, Jinhao's,1935 Parker Deluxe Challenger, 1930s Eversharp Gold Seal RingTop, 1940s Sheaffer Tuckaway, 1944 Sheaffer Triumph, Visconti Van Gogh midi, Esties!(SJ, T, and J),Cross Townsend Medalist & Aventura, 1930s Mentmore Autoflow, A bunch of Conway-Stewarts 84, Platinum 3776 Chartres Blue(med); Montegrappa Elmo (broad nib), Delta "The Journal" (med nib)

#3 dalliance

dalliance

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 37 posts
  • Location:Edinburgh
  • Flag:

Posted 21 May 2012 - 21:10

Thanks, an interesting piece. I'm sure it works for him but, to put the other side, I know authors who type because it has the speed they need to capture the words tumbling out. Whatever works best for you, I guess.
I rode over the mountains to Huddersfield. A wilder people I never saw in England.
The men, women and children filled the streets as we rode along, and appeared just ready to devour us.
- John Wesley, 1757

#4 brunico

brunico

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 924 posts
  • Location:London
  • Flag:

Posted 21 May 2012 - 21:53

Neat article. My old college supervisor always said she could tell who'd typed and who'd written longhand when students read out their essays.

#5 rwilsonedn

rwilsonedn

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,752 posts

Posted 21 May 2012 - 22:35

Thanks, an interesting piece. I'm sure it works for him but, to put the other side, I know authors who type because it has the speed they need to capture the words tumbling out. Whatever works best for you, I guess.

They must be very gifted. When words come tumbling out of me they aren't worth capturing. I too use a fountain pen for composition specifically because it slows down the recording process and allows me to think twice but cut once.
ron

#6 tomgartin

tomgartin

    I'm not the big Lebowski.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 951 posts
  • Location:Decatur, GA
  • Flag:

Posted 22 May 2012 - 02:31

I love this article. It's good inspiration for me as I'm currently working on a book, and it's always nice to be reminded of how other authors approach the art of the written word.
Thanks for sharing this :)

- - -


#7 humblescribbler

humblescribbler

    and Zen there were none

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 610 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 22 May 2012 - 03:28

Thank you so much! One of my favorite travel writers (and fiction, e.g. The Mosquito Coast.) Wonderful sentiments and wisdom. :thumbup:

His work inspired me to (attempt) writing while travelling, but my forearms on airplane trays never can fit, and I can't squeeze the elbows enough to avoid fellow passengers. When I tried on a modern train, the rocking (I'm in the cheap cars) made hash out of my already incoherent scribble!! I resigned myself to keeping a pocket notebook when I journey and stealing one or three words that would -- with luck -- help me remember anything noteworthy (heh), and try to capture the experience in a journal later each night. It does make one (sometimes naively, I guess) wish for slower motion in one's life. :embarrassed_smile:

#8 max dog

max dog

    I belong to FPAA (Fountain Pen Addicts Anonymous)

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 669 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 26 May 2012 - 06:54


Thanks, an interesting piece. I'm sure it works for him but, to put the other side, I know authors who type because it has the speed they need to capture the words tumbling out. Whatever works best for you, I guess.

They must be very gifted. When words come tumbling out of me they aren't worth capturing. I too use a fountain pen for composition specifically because it slows down the recording process and allows me to think twice but cut once.
ron

When words come tumbling out with speed, it's called mediocrity.

Without Art, the crudeness of reality would make the world unbearable.  

George Bernard Shaw