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Waterman 32 Mahogany


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#1 Xof72000

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 08:16

Hi everyone !

Let me share with you this Waterman 32 mahogany that newly arrived to join my collection.
I am right if I say it comes from the 30's ? (if someone can confirm).

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It's the first time I have a 32 model with a clip were the name is written of the lenght of the clip (and not verticaly).

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I'm also puzzled by his size : it appears smaller and thicker than the others 32 models I have (here next to a red and black one), so I can't find any logic in the numering system... : can anyone tell something about it ?

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Thanks !
:thumbup:

#2 brettttt

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 15:10

Hi Xof,

I had not noticed until your post that the 32 isn't very well documented in the catalogs that are circulating. The 1933 catalog implies that the 32 was only available in Jet, though there's a 94 in Brown. In the 1936 catalog the 32s are gone (in favor of the nearly identical 3); Brown has been dropped altogether. Compared to the earlier 32, the 3 has a non-riveted clip, a slightly different lever, and seems to be a bit longer and thinner.

Based on these scraps of information, my best guess is that your pens are from slightly different evolutionary stages between the two shown in the catalog. I.e., the brown pen shares most features with the 1933 catalog version and so would presumably be earlier than the Black Pearl pen, which looks to me exactly like the 1936 catalog version (but for the name).

Pictures:

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If 1934 or 1935 catalogs ever show up maybe the picture will become clearer. Part of the reason that this topic interests me so much is that one of my favorite pens (because it's extra-fine & very flexible) is a Brown 32 similar to yours. Differences are that mine is missing the clip, which appears to have been non-riveted, and it has a weird smooth, wide band different from any other contemporary Watermans that I've seen. Like yours, it is wider and shorter than the typical 32s. If I get a chance I'll shoot a photo and upload it in case anyone is interested.

Thanks for posting. This has been educational.

Best regards,
Brett

#3 Xof72000

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 15:41

Bretttt,

Thanks too for your answer, it's very pedagogic.
I'm quite proud of my purchase ! :thumbup:


Are the catalog you refer to uploadable ? If yes, where can I find them ? Thanks !!

Edited by Xof72000, 27 April 2012 - 15:46.


#4 brettttt

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 18:03

Thanks too for your answer, it's very pedagogic.


Sorry. I've been hanging around college campuses too long.

Are the catalog you refer to uploadable ? If yes, where can I find them ? Thanks !!


Yes, they're part of the amazingly great library at PCA (Pen Collectors of America). Costs money to join, but it's a good cause and the library alone is well worth it.

BTW, congratulations on the pen!

Brett

#5 Ray-Vigo

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 22:51

I agree- that looks like the early 1930s 32 with the riveted clip. I have the same pen in black-- it's basically the pen shown in the 1933 catalog. The black 32 is the spiritual successor to the black hard rubber 52 (which was itself the successor to the 12PSF). I've seen the 32 called "the popular line" in the marketing literature, as it seems to have been your basic lever filled fountain pen with a #2 gold nib. They're fine, simple pens that often write very nicely. They can be had with a variety of nibs, including some very soft/flexible ones.

I also have a 94 from the same period. It's a more luxurious pen, but functionally no better than the 32. They're both lever box pens with gold nibs and celluloid bodies. Both have hard rubber sections. You have a good find.

Edited by Ray-Vigo, 30 April 2012 - 22:54.


#6 notbob

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 16:00

Yes, they're part of the amazingly great library at PCA (Pen Collectors of America). Costs money to join, but it's a good cause and the library alone is well worth it.


Yes, it seems a worthwhile investment. One question: If join this org, can I then download materials from their library, or may I only VIEW these materials online?
nulla dies sine linea

#7 gregamckinney

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 22:32


Yes, they're part of the amazingly great library at PCA (Pen Collectors of America). Costs money to join, but it's a good cause and the library alone is well worth it.


Yes, it seems a worthwhile investment. One question: If join this org, can I then download materials from their library, or may I only VIEW these materials online?


You can download the materials. Most, if not all of what I've viewed and downloaded are PDFs.

Regards, greg