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2013 Writers Series


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#61 Pen Nut

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 17:24

Would anyone consider owning a pen that they disliked the looks of but had a life long admiration of the person it was dedicated to ?

That said would you consider a pen that was stunning but dedicated to a person whose works you did not like or understand ?

My heart says English, my head says Japanese, my hand holds German (pens, cars or beer ?)

 

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#62 JLS1

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 18:06

I hope that we will see a Rudyard Kipling pen or a Japanese-themed WE pen some day. =) A Mishima pen would probably be interesting, but such a choice might be regarded as politically controversial. Perhaps a pen honouring Kawabata would be an better option for Montblanc. Which WE pens are you hoping to see in the future?


I agree with you on both counts. Kipling 'fits' the MB WE profile pretty well in that he was influential and his writing has survived long beyond his years. (Although I suspect many people only know of him via the Disney version of "The Jungle Book", which is a shame)

As for a Japanese pen, I see many options ranging from Murasaki Shikibu (who innovated the novel format w/the Tale of Genji in the 11th century) to Natsume Soseki (who's both less controversial than Mishima and much less known outside of Japan) but also through poets like Basho. Unfortunately, even if MB did do a Japanese WE (even if for the Asian market alone), I wonder how they would interpret such a pen that hasn't already been done by high-end Japanese pen makers like Nakaya, Namiki and Sailor (nevermind Hakase and Danitrio)?

#63 JLS1

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 18:08

Would anyone consider owning a pen that they disliked the looks of but had a life long admiration of the person it was dedicated to ?

That said would you consider a pen that was stunning but dedicated to a person whose works you did not like or understand ?


Hmm...tough questions. I'd be more comfortable with a pen that was dedicated to someone I admired but wasn't quite what I was expecting than stunning pens crafted to honor those whose work I don't identify with.

#64 rockspyder

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 18:58

Would anyone consider owning a pen that they disliked the looks of but had a life long admiration of the person it was dedicated to ?

That said would you consider a pen that was stunning but dedicated to a person whose works you did not like or understand ?

Both.
Although a pen's looks are by far the most likely reason for buying, and then researching the person as a result (whether or not I like or understand the work), I would also take interest in a pen devoted to someone I admire, regardless of its looks.
For example, I decided before knowing what it would look like, to go for the Einstein. Fortunately the pen did not disappoint, it is great, but even if it was hideous, I would still buy it. I would also buy a Marie Curie and Kahlil Gibran without knowing what they looked like, amongst others.

#65 Pen Nut

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 19:17


Would anyone consider owning a pen that they disliked the looks of but had a life long admiration of the person it was dedicated to ?

That said would you consider a pen that was stunning but dedicated to a person whose works you did not like or understand ?


Hmm...tough questions. I'd be more comfortable with a pen that was dedicated to someone I admired but wasn't quite what I was expecting than stunning pens crafted to honor those whose work I don't identify with.


Think I would be the opposite of you (who set this damn question) :embarrassed_smile:

may have to give this a bit of thought and give an example or two

My heart says English, my head says Japanese, my hand holds German (pens, cars or beer ?)

 

" I spend 95% of my income on pens..........the rest I just waste " 


#66 mongrelnomad

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 19:38

Balzac's a great choice.
Too many pens; too little writing.

#67 bjornhansson

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 19:45

Would anyone consider owning a pen that they disliked the looks of but had a life long admiration of the person it was dedicated to ?

That said would you consider a pen that was stunning but dedicated to a person whose works you did not like or understand ?


I certainly wouldn't mind owning a pen dedicated to someone whose work I admired, but I would probably hesitate to buy a pen I didn't like the looks of, especially if it was very expensive. If I felt that such a pen was not at all in the style of the person to whom it was dedicated, it is possible that I would feel an actual dislike for the pen. If that was the case, I certainly wouldn't buy it.

I probably wouldn't buy a pen dedicated to someone whose works or ideas I disliked, regardless of how beautiful it was.

If I simply didn't understand the works of a person to whom a pen had been dedicated, but still liked the pen a lot, I think I would have a good incentive to study that person's works in more detail. :)

#68 bjornhansson

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 20:01


I hope that we will see a Rudyard Kipling pen or a Japanese-themed WE pen some day. =) A Mishima pen would probably be interesting, but such a choice might be regarded as politically controversial. Perhaps a pen honouring Kawabata would be an better option for Montblanc. Which WE pens are you hoping to see in the future?


I agree with you on both counts. Kipling 'fits' the MB WE profile pretty well in that he was influential and his writing has survived long beyond his years. (Although I suspect many people only know of him via the Disney version of "The Jungle Book", which is a shame)

As for a Japanese pen, I see many options ranging from Murasaki Shikibu (who innovated the novel format w/the Tale of Genji in the 11th century) to Natsume Soseki (who's both less controversial than Mishima and much less known outside of Japan) but also through poets like Basho. Unfortunately, even if MB did do a Japanese WE (even if for the Asian market alone), I wonder how they would interpret such a pen that hasn't already been done by high-end Japanese pen makers like Nakaya, Namiki and Sailor (nevermind Hakase and Danitrio)?


I like your suggestions regarding a Japanese pen, particularly the idea of dedicating it to Basho. Murasaki Shikibu would also be a good choice! :)

#69 BrandonA

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 21:55

I think the Proust, Kafka and Mann pens are good examples of authors I'd never heard of and although I buy the books all the pens are loosely based on I will never read the books as they are far from my interest. These three WE pens though are right up there as my favourites.

M clearly a WE fanboy so I'd buy the pen no matter who the author was or what the pen looked like. I've invested too much into the series to end up with gaps in the collection.

I'm thinking about buying more LE pens outside of the WE series, I'm currently looking at the Great Characters and the POA. Whichever pens I buy in these series will be bought purely on looks as I will never own the full sets.

My Collection:
Montblanc Writers Edition: Hemingway, Christie, Wilde, Voltaire, Dumas, Dostoevsky, Poe, Proust, Schiller, Dickens, Fitzgerald (set), Verne, Kafka, Cervantes, Woolf, Faulkner, Shaw, Mann, Twain, Collodi, Swift, Balzac & Defoe
Montblanc Einstein (3,000) FP
Montblanc Heritage 1912 Resin FP
Montblanc Starwalker Resin: FP/BP/MP. Montblanc Traveller FP.
Play WE game. or POA game.


#70 stevekolt

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 02:40

My personal request would be for an Ayn Rand WE. I'll take two, one to use, and one to put up for the kids/grandkids.

#71 Audit This

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 04:00

My personal request would be for an Ayn Rand WE. I'll take two, one to use, and one to put up for the kids/grandkids.


Never going to happen...But if it did, oh the irony!

http://www.unicef.or...ndex_25095.html