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Pilot Vanishing Point Extra Fine Nib


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#1 Oranges and Apples

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 19:50

This is a review of the Pilot Vanishing Point Extra Fine Nib. This nib was release in the United States sometime in April of 2012. I am not going to review the entire Pilot Vanishing Point, only the Extra Fine Nib - anyway it is all about the nib in the end.

The Nib has an amazingly small tip. It produces the thinnest line I have ever used. For such a fine line, I have no other reference to compare it so this would be the new standard of an extra fine for me.

To use this nib, a light hand would be necessary, I suppose. I write with a very light touch and the nib is smooth as expected from Pilot, so no surprise there. When using this nib, I seem to write my characters a lot smaller than I would normally write.

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Edited by Oranges and Apples, 26 April 2012 - 20:25.


#2 HDoug

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 19:55

I didn't know they introduced an EF. Thanks for posting. My VP F nibs are equivalent of EF Pelikan nibs. A VP EF may even be too fine for me. But I may have to try it and see...

Doug

#3 Oranges and Apples

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 19:56

I would like to add a note that the scan doesn't pick up the difference between the extra fine and the fine very well. It seems like a bigger difference when I actually look at the writing in person.

#4 jzents

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 23:45

This is a review of the Pilot Vanishing Point Extra Fine Nib. This nib was release in the United States sometime in April of 2012. I am not going to review the entire Pilot Vanishing Point, only the Extra Fine Nib - anyway it is all about the nib in the end.

The Nib has an amazingly small tip. It produces the thinnest line I have ever used. For such a fine line, I have no other reference to compare it so this would be the new standard of an extra fine for me.

To use this nib, a light hand would be necessary, I suppose. I write with a very light touch and the nib is smooth as expected from Pilot, so no surprise there. When using this nib, I seem to write my characters a lot smaller than I would normally write.

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How did you get it. I cannot find it on the pilotpen.us site? My ignorance is revealed yet again. Thanks in advance. Cheers!

#5 CAG_1787

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 23:49

I was glad to hear about the EF nib. It has definitely increased my interest in the VP, so it was nice to see your comparisons. Thanks, mate!
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#6 smodak

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 00:44

Great review! Extra fines are not for me. I wish they come up with a extra broad (or C ) nib.

#7 Oranges and Apples

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 02:53

It could be purchased from isellpens.com gouletpens.com nibs.com richardspens.com and other sites as well I am sure.

#8 ninad

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 02:21

I just got an EF Vanishing point as well, and I must say that this is a great pen and the nib is truly excellent. As Oranges and Apples said, you need a very light touch, but if you do, and if you like super thin lines, this is the pen to get.

I use it for my extensive note taking: I need thin lines for marginalia, and also for my written notes where I like to write a dense page where I can contain notes for an entire book on one 8X12 sheet (one or two sides). The Vanishing Point EF is the best note taking pen there is, in my opinion, and I have had it only for a few days now!

The advantage of the EF is also that the tiny cartridge lasts much longer than in an M or a B nib, so you need to worry less about making sure you have replacement cartridges.

I am considering selling many of my other pens, mostly because I have decided that a VP with an EF is pretty much my < $500 grail pen. Posted Image

I was concerned that the EF nib might be scratchy and so I purchased mine from J. Mottishaw who adjusted it for 6/10 flow and no-pressure touch. That was, however, only because I was so sure that with a good nib, this will the pen I use most. From what I hear, Pilot/Namiki QC is so good that most nibs are great out of the box.

#9 XiaoMG

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 08:06

I haven't used mine in a while, and I just got another nib unit from the Goulets, so I thought I'd ink it up. Out of the box, it was wet enough to be almost as wide as my F nibs, so I crossed the tines a little and got it set to about where my EF Prera is. I actually could get it even dryer for finer letters, but the current setting seems to be pretty satisfactory for me without sacrificing the ability to write a little larger (too dry/fine and it cannot handle bigger/faster writing).

In the picture...
Paper: Rhodia DotPad (gray dots are the 5mm ruling)
Pilot M - 78G + R&K Scabiosa
Pilot F - Custom 74 + Iroshizuku Ku-Jaku
Pilot EF - Prera EF + Noodler's Black
Pilot EF - Decimo EF + Iroshizuku Kon-Peki
Posted Image

Robert.

#10 jzents

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 22:53

I haven't used mine in a while, and I just got another nib unit from the Goulets, so I thought I'd ink it up. Out of the box, it was wet enough to be almost as wide as my F nibs, so I crossed the tines a little and got it set to about where my EF Prera is. I actually could get it even dryer for finer letters, but the current setting seems to be pretty satisfactory for me without sacrificing the ability to write a little larger (too dry/fine and it cannot handle bigger/faster writing).

In the picture...
Paper: Rhodia DotPad (gray dots are the 5mm ruling)
Pilot M - 78G + R&K Scabiosa
Pilot F - Custom 74 + Iroshizuku Ku-Jaku
Pilot EF - Prera EF + Noodler's Black
Pilot EF - Decimo EF + Iroshizuku Kon-Peki
Posted Image

What do you mean "crossed the tines"? I have heard of "crossing the Tiber" but that is something completely different. Can you enlighten me?

#11 jzents

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 22:55

This is a review of the Pilot Vanishing Point Extra Fine Nib. This nib was release in the United States sometime in April of 2012. I am not going to review the entire Pilot Vanishing Point, only the Extra Fine Nib - anyway it is all about the nib in the end.

The Nib has an amazingly small tip. It produces the thinnest line I have ever used. For such a fine line, I have no other reference to compare it so this would be the new standard of an extra fine for me.

To use this nib, a light hand would be necessary, I suppose. I write with a very light touch and the nib is smooth as expected from Pilot, so no surprise there. When using this nib, I seem to write my characters a lot smaller than I would normally write.

Posted Image

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Fantastic!

#12 imadeadend

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 02:22

. . .

What do you mean "crossed the tines"? I have heard of "crossing the Tiber" but that is something completely different. Can you enlighten me?


Crossing the tines is a process where you push each tine up and over the other to force the tines further together and decrease flow. It can be reversed via the "flattening" trick (more info on Binder's site).

I have done this many times on a fair few nibs and works wonders on those gushers.

Please note that this is a risky operation and can disfigure the nib if you are not careful.

On topic: I bought an EF nib unit off a fellow member and i can vouch for the fine-ness and smoothness of this wonderful nib :)

Edited by imadeadend, 10 May 2012 - 02:23.


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#13 XiaoMG

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 06:09

What do you mean "crossed the tines"? I have heard of "crossing the Tiber" but that is something completely different. Can you enlighten me?

imadeadend summed it up pretty well. You push one tine back and behind the other a little just as a person crosses their fingers. I generally do it to both sides to make sure the point remains centered. After each tine cross, realign and check the flow to make sure it is not too extreme (runs completely dry unless pressed hard).

A very fine nib can be very wet, which makes thin black lines look very dark, but the appearance ends up quite close to what you get from a normal fine nib without the smooth ride across the paper. A tad on the dryer side, especially with ready-flowing inks like Iroshizuku, and you can get a nice crisp line that isn't too weak and is noticeably finer than what you get from the typical F range.
Robert.

#14 RPB

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 17:56

I only recently moved to a VP 'F' from a broken TWSBI 530 'F'. I love it. I got mine from Richard Binder and the nib is just superb. I struggle to see any difference though between the EF above and the F???
Looks the same to me. I must say though, I expected my F nib to be finer than the TWSBI and it does not look much thinner. I mostly write a journal in the Design-Y books so the paper is awesome. Very very think yet takes the ink so well.

#15 marcomillions

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 01:07

I got my XF nib with a matte finish ("Stealth") VP from Fahrey's. At Fahrey's, the XF is available ONLY with the matte-finish model; standard VPs go no finer than Fine.

The XF draws a noticeably finer line than do my two other Fine-nibbed pens--an older VP and a Sailor. Actually, the line is quite alarmingly fine, and on certain papers the nib makes a racket when writing quickly. But it is a well-behaved and dependable nib for all that. I have been using Noodler's Borealis Black with it, an ink with a good flow and also a very black black. The XF nib has never dried out or clogged in any way. I never have a hard start. (I have been using it regularly for several months now.)

The XF is particularly appreciated with very thin papers: the bagasse papers available at Staples, or the Tomoe River papers, as the nib limits the amount of show-through. Also, of course, you can write much longer on a tank of ink with this XF than with an other nib size.

On a bright surface with a very black ink, I sometimes imagine I'm seeing the same effects as I've occasionally seen with dedicated engineering pens with India ink. It is perfect for making small but legible marginal notes, something I do a lot of. I love this nib.

Marc
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#16 yutokicker

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 17:01

Thank you for the review. I was contemplating on whether to purchase the EF nib. With your review, I will definitely add to my collection.

#17 pakmanpony

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 17:15

When I got my VP 2012 LE I had an ef put in it. I've always been a fine to extra fine fan but wow this thing is fine! I would rate it and xxf up to any other extra fine I've owned. I absolutely love it! Finally a nib where the ink in a VP won't run out in a hurry!

#18 hashish81

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 18:48

Does any one know how the VP EF compare to a Lamy EF? I have a VP Medium and it's too wide for me. I love my Lamy Safari EF, but pen is too light in my hand. I like the feel of the VP. I am considering buying an EF nib, just looking for some advice. Regards.

#19 tguk911

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 20:50

Does any one know how the VP EF compare to a Lamy EF? I have a VP Medium and it's too wide for me. I love my Lamy Safari EF, but pen is too light in my hand. I like the feel of the VP. I am considering buying an EF nib, just looking for some advice. Regards.


The Pilot VP extra-fine are going to me finer than the Lamy extra -fine cause Japanese nibs in general are finer than most German nibs although Pilots medium is closer to a Lamy medium but there fine and extra fine are much finer than Lamy's. If you like your Lamy extra-fine than get a VP fine but if you want it a little finer then go for the extra-fine. You can get a visual look here http://www.gouletpen...ook_s/1114.htm.

#20 Audit This

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 21:45

I've switched from the F to EF and love it. As mentioned above, it is a great nib. It is perfect if you mark up a lot of documents and need to write in tight spots.

#21 whitelily

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 10:48

When I ordered my two decimos, they came with F nibs from Japan (made for the Asian market, and not the Western market), and that nib was more like a XF by Western standards (putting down a fine line that looks like the one you made with your XF nib). The F nib I ordered in my Vanishing Point (nib for Western market), however, was a lot closer to most F nibs I´ve seen (however, on the fine side).

Thank you for sharing with us! :-)

#22 drwright

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 16:29

When I ordered my two decimos, they came with F nibs from Japan (made for the Asian market, and not the Western market), and that nib was more like a XF by Western standards (putting down a fine line that looks like the one you made with your XF nib). The F nib I ordered in my Vanishing Point (nib for Western market), however, was a lot closer to most F nibs I´ve seen (however, on the fine side).

Thank you for sharing with us! :-)


My experience is similar. My Decimo F nib is much more like an XF, especially when compared to my VP F, which is broader than the Decimo(though close to a Lamy or TWSBI XF nib). Interestingly, the Decimo nib is smoother than the VP nib.

I wonder if this is a common occurrence- Decimo nibs being generally finer than their VP counterparts? Anyone else with both care to weigh in? I would imagine this is just simple nib variation, since the Decimo and VP nibs are the same, but perhaps it's intentional on Pilot's part?

Best,
Dan

#23 hashish81

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 15:11


Does any one know how the VP EF compare to a Lamy EF? I have a VP Medium and it's too wide for me. I love my Lamy Safari EF, but pen is too light in my hand. I like the feel of the VP. I am considering buying an EF nib, just looking for some advice. Regards.


The Pilot VP extra-fine are going to me finer than the Lamy extra -fine cause Japanese nibs in general are finer than most German nibs although Pilots medium is closer to a Lamy medium but there fine and extra fine are much finer than Lamy's. If you like your Lamy extra-fine than get a VP fine but if you want it a little finer then go for the extra-fine. You can get a visual look here http://www.gouletpen...ook_s/1114.htm.


Thanks for the advice. When I first bought my Lamy EF, I thought that was too thick and wanted to go thinner. Then I got my medium VP (in an effort to learn to write larger) and the Lamy EF became a relief. Since I do mark up a lot docs and write small (as Audit points out) I think I am going to go for the the EF.

(I wish I had enough posts to put my medium VP in the classifieds section to fund the EF, in time I guess)

#24 tomkeb

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 18:11

Does anybody here have VP <EF> and/or <F> and Prera/Metropolitan <F>? I would like to know how these compare…


k6ic.png


#25 oknrabata

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 20:04

There you go: Pilot VP ef and Prera f



#26 inotrym

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 20:52

Thanks for the pic. I' ve been wondering myself.

 

Interesting results.

Did you use the same ink? VP must be a lot wetter, but the line width seems to be of no big difference.

 

 

Now how about a comparison with the Penmanship EF nib?

(i know i am asking for too much... :blush: )



#27 oknrabata

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 03:41

It's the same ink - Pelikan blue-black (My standard testing ink, as is it so cheap in Germany. I never write with it though).

 

There is a little difference in width but not that much. I personally would stick with the prera because the nib is much smoother (though drier) on mine. Although my VP was bought from Richard Binder I find it a litte too scratchy for fast writing.

 

Sorry but I don't have that other pen :mellow:



#28 inotrym

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 06:00

Oh, never mind. Thank you so much for your answer! :)



#29 tomkeb

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 06:25

Thanks for the comparison! Just one more question: how would you measure the two nibs in terms of writing?


Edited by tomkeb, 10 June 2013 - 07:09.

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