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Regrind Townsend 14K M To Flex Nib


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#1 ljkd13

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 14:41

Has anyone done this? I love my townsend and the 14K nib, but it's a medium and too wide for normal writing. I'm a calligrapher and thought if I could get it re-ground to have some flex, I could use it for simple copperplate/spencerian jobs. Has anyone ever tried this before?

I feel like the pen writes so wet that it would be a great candidate for a flex nib.

Any advice would be appreciated.

-Luke

#2 ljkd13

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 14:43

Or - would a vintage flex nib fit this pen? Size?

Would this work?
http://www.ebay.com/...1#ht_500wt_1413

#3 Mickey

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 16:13

Unless you're a lefty, the easier (and better) solution is dip pens in an oblique holder. It's difficult (but not impossible) to get the Spencerian and Copperplate shades to fall correctly with a straight pen.

But I believe that since my life began

The most I've had is just a talent to abuse.

Hey ho, if love were all.

 

With apologies to Noel Coward


#4 ljkd13

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 16:35

Unless you're a lefty, the easier (and better) solution is dip pens in an oblique holder. It's difficult (but not impossible) to get the Spencerian and Copperplate shades to fall correctly with a straight pen.


I have dip pens and oblique holders that I use for professional jobs, however I was more interested in making my regular fountain pen flexy and thought that this may be a good way of doing it without getting a new pen.

I have an ahab and several other noodlers pens, but I was wanted a nicer feeling pen (namely my townsend) to be flexy instead.

#5 Mickey

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 17:34

I wasn't sure how comfortable you are writing side-saddle, but, evidently, it's no big thing. Let me know how it goes with your Townsend. So far, I haven't run into a customized modern pen (I have a couple) which comes close to what I can do with a dip pen. Maybe you'll have better luck.

But I believe that since my life began

The most I've had is just a talent to abuse.

Hey ho, if love were all.

 

With apologies to Noel Coward


#6 Pen Nut

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 17:50

Done to flexi no, but I have just taken my M Cross Townsend to a fine italic and it is writing very well. Changed from loupe work to tool inspection microscope and it makes things a lot more clearer

My heart says English, my head says Japanese, my hand holds German (pens, cars or beer ?)

 

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#7 ljkd13

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 17:55

I wasn't sure how comfortable you are writing side-saddle, but, evidently, it's no big thing. Let me know how it goes with your Townsend. So far, I haven't run into a customized modern pen (I have a couple) which comes close to what I can do with a dip pen. Maybe you'll have better luck.


Yeah - I'd just like something with some flex for everyday use, and although I love my noodler's pens, they are finicky for me. I also prefer the feel of the Cross.

I'm thinking that if I could find a vintage nib that fits, I'd rather try that first so I didn't have to change up the original Cross nib, being 14K and all.

Is there any way to find out what size nib would fit it - like an old Swan #2 flex?

#8 Miadhawk

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 19:29

How about sending it to a nib technician? Richard Binder (Richardspens.com) or John Mottishaw (nibs.com)? They can both add flex to a 14k good nib.

(Only affiliation is as a customer of Mr. Mottishaw)
The little things really count.

#9 thingofbeauty

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 19:11

I am new here so forgive me if I stray a bit but you are all so knowledgeable.

When I was younger, I loved using fountain pens but moved on to ballpoints and computers. Have just inherited my Dad's vintage Townsend with 14k nib. It's pristine, never used and intimidates me. He loved fountain pens and I want to use it as a way of staying connected to him but afraid I might break the nib or ruin it. Is there a cheapie FP that I should use for practice? Also, what kind of ink would you all recommend?

#10 Russ

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 16:42

Cross nibs and feeds are press-fit into the section. Any work done to narrow or thin the nib has to be done with the assembly intact, which becomes particularly difficult due to interference of the feed. Narrowing the nib would, by itself, yield only marginal change toward a (semi-)flex goal.

I like the Townsend and wanted one in semi-flex also, but never went through with it for this reason.

Now if anyone can procure the press-fit machine and a supply of modified nibs . . . we'll have a great situation.

#11 lovemy51

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 09:00

have you seen Pendelton's work: http://www.fountainp..._1#entry2428854
Lovemy51 Posted Image




pleese, forgeeve my bad espelling!! Posted Image

#12 Chris

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 12:29

I am new here so forgive me if I stray a bit but you are all so knowledgeable.

When I was younger, I loved using fountain pens but moved on to ballpoints and computers. Have just inherited my Dad's vintage Townsend with 14k nib. It's pristine, never used and intimidates me. He loved fountain pens and I want to use it as a way of staying connected to him but afraid I might break the nib or ruin it. Is there a cheapie FP that I should use for practice? Also, what kind of ink would you all recommend?


As you have used fountain pens before you will easily remember the simple rules:
Don't drop it :thumbup:
And don't press hard ;) .
You should guide the ink across the paper with the nib rather than try to push the ink through the page :lol:

Apart from that, enjoy using a great pen and for the nicest reason.

I have found my Townsends to be very tolerant of ink brands so use whatever colour and brand you like. There are endless suggestions here but all of the easily available brands will work perfectly well though you may start experimenting with time.
I use Waterman, Pelikan, Diamine, Montblanc, Lamy, Aurora, Visconti, Noodlers etc without a second thought just depending on the colour I want to use.

Chris