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Monoline Cursive Handwriting


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#1 Ken Fraser

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 15:13

This example of monline, cursive handwriting is a based on the font called "Kaufmann".

It's easy to write and easy to read, although it's perhaps a little bit too spiky for some tastes.

It can be adopted and modified as personal handwriting, or certain elements can be incorporated into an existing style. If there is sufficient interest, I can write out the entire alphabet.

Opinions are welcome, as ever.

caliken

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#2 DET

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 16:11

I for one would like to the whole alphabet -- upper and lower case.

#3 ajoe

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 16:14

I for one would like to the whole alphabet -- upper and lower case.


+1


#4 Ken Fraser

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 00:00

Here's the whole alphabet

caliken

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Edited by caliken, 12 December 2011 - 08:15.

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#5 ajoe

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 00:29

Here's the whole alphabet


Thank you kind sir!


#6 DET

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 00:33

Beautiful!

#7 beak

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 00:36

Thanks Ken. It's good that we see momoline given attention by someone such as yourself; most of the interest seems to be for hands with variation in ink-line, and this form is neglected, I think. There are so many 'round' nibs out there, after all.

Would you agree that clarity is increased in very small scripts when using a round nib? It seems to be the case with me, at least. Particularly fond of monoline nibs with have a set width when used normally (or with increased pressure) yet will trail to a thinner line when lifted (skimmed) - I don't know if this has a technical name.
Sincerely, beak. God does not work in mysterious ways – he works in ways that are indistinguishable from his non-existence.

#8 fast14riot

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 06:49

That is a very nice font! outstanding work!


-Xander
Now, we must all fear evil men. But there is another kind of evil which we must fear most, and that is the indifference of good men.

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#9 Ken Fraser

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 13:37

Would you agree that clarity is increased in very small scripts when using a round nib?


I agree, entirely. Sometimes I feel that nowadays, too much emphasis is placed on the effect of shading lettering and not enough attention is paid to the beauty of the forms themselves.

I actually find myself preferring the clean, crisp monolines of "Business Writing" from the hand of E C Mills and others, to Spencerian Script.

Whilst not exactly preferring the monoline version of Italic Script to the normal edged-nib version, I like it as least as much - again, for its clarity of line.

Ken

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Edited by caliken, 12 December 2011 - 13:43.

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#10 Hex

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 14:29

Thank you again Ken for this wonderful example.

Whenever I see you "whip out" a new (to me) style, after admiring it for a bit, I wonder how the heck you keep them straight in your head .

It's like you flip a selector switch to the desired style and voila, out it comes.
That's an amazing skill you have there kind sir.
Hex, aka George

#11 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 16 December 2011 - 09:06

Caliken one must start some where when learning writing, and the fancy draws the eye, more than does subtlety.

One needs experience to appreciate the many forms and fonts.

"Kaufmann" means salesman in German.
I know so little about writing, but am writing a western. In the 1870 and perhaps before- to modern 1900 there was a 'business script' that was used, in it was faster and clearer than Copperplate and the 'new' Spenserian.

Well for all I know Kaufmann was the designer of the font. :happyberet:

Semi-flex is an “almost” flex; not a ‘flex’ nib. It is great for regular writing. It can give you some fancy; but it is not made for real fancy writing. For that get a 'flexi' or a "flex" nib.

"

 

Wider than Normal does not exist. Wider than Japanese does. Every company has it's very own standard + slop/tolerance. Developed from the users of it's pens only; not the users of other companies pens. The size you grind a nib to, is your standard only. Paper and ink matter to nib width. Thank god for 1/2 sizes or it would be boring.