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Fun With Handwriting Practice


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#91 TheOriginalStevenH

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Posted 10 September 2011 - 07:51

I'll take your suggestions in mind and try to write smaller. The size of the pen line might get in the way.


Here is my beginning handwriting practice

I'll do two a day. I found this old handwriting practice worksheet and am going to relearn the basics, I've already done a few but I'm going to go back and start over and see if improvement can be achieved.


Steven, a very nice start, I think. Good idea to start with the basics. I enjoy writing a page or two per session, using each letter of the alphabet to start an each word on a line with. It's not even boring, because I have to think of words, concentrate on letter forms, notice problems and try to fix them in the next word.

If you manage, over time, to write just a little smaller (like the separate letters 'b' on your sheet), or increase spacing just a bit, your hand should look quite pleasing.

A guide sheet can help with spacing, consistency etc. I like Achim's Spencerian sheet, although it uses quite a strong slant. GhostShip Blue also has some nice guide sheets with an easier slant for those use to writing more upright. I'm sure he'll mail them to you if you PM him.

I'm thinking of doing some exercises from Ames' Guide to Self-Instruction in Practical and Artistic Penmanship, as found on the IAMPETH website. They have more books in their section Rare Books.


Favorite Pen: TWSBI 540 (F) is my "Special Pen" Lamy Vista (F) is my take around pen.
Favorite Ink(s): Baystate Blue, J.Herbin 1670 --- Current Ink: Noodler's: Baystate Blue, TWSBI 540 (F), Private Reserve; Sherwood Green, Lamy Vista (F)
Favorite Paper: Rhodia Dot Pad A5

#92 ihtzazqamar

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Posted 10 September 2011 - 20:33

Here are a couple of sample sheets I did today. Taking on the advice given, today's practice is to maintain a consistent x height. In the left sheet I used a graph paper and then tried it with the 'waist' line in the right sheet. I have used all of inked pens to see the difference in nib points.

Green lines at the top: Sheaffer Calligraphy nib pen i.e. a stub nib
red lines: Sheaffer M nib
Turquoise lines: Parker 51... I think it is a medium nib
Blue-Black: My regular Pelikan M400, B nib
Black: Newly acquired Eversharp Symphony, XF flexible nib
Green at bottom: Flexible dip pen

My observations:
* This kind of excercise definitely helps. Note that I have included the alphabets which remain between base and waist lines.
* I tend to stay just a shade above the base line... I do not know why though.
* I still skip joins though less frequently.
* Fountain Pen movement mimicking a flex dip pen helps.

I hope this helps some of us. It has helped me.

Regards
Ihtzaz

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#93 TheOriginalStevenH

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 00:58

Ah I see, comparing my natural handwriting to this I see how this is cleaner because each letter is not of the wavering heights. I shall try that too
Favorite Pen: TWSBI 540 (F) is my "Special Pen" Lamy Vista (F) is my take around pen.
Favorite Ink(s): Baystate Blue, J.Herbin 1670 --- Current Ink: Noodler's: Baystate Blue, TWSBI 540 (F), Private Reserve; Sherwood Green, Lamy Vista (F)
Favorite Paper: Rhodia Dot Pad A5

#94 ihtzazqamar

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 19:17

Hello, here is what I finally prepared for this thread. I spend more time in copperplate practice using dip pens. I then try to port something to my fountain pen writing. I am sure to develop a hand which is more pleasing and consistent.


Posted Image


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Having fun,


Ihtzaz



#95 GhostShip Blue

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 20:20

Looking very nice there, ihtzaz. I love the influence of Copperplate that's so apparent in that sample.
@ TheOriginalStevenH: The threatened close up has arrived. Cautionary tale; Practice every day or else:

"If you show us a drunk blonde chick in her underwear, she has to die. That's just how we roll." - I wish I knew who to attribute that to. T'weren't me.

Posted Image
Ain't great, but it's the best I've got. So far.


#96 ihtzazqamar

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Posted 14 September 2011 - 19:08

GhostShipBlue: A good sample and nice handwriting. I see different pens (or nibs, I should say) in action. Which one you feel most comfortable with?

Here is another sample. I am fixed on the idea of writing a line in copperplate style, larger letters and then filling the page with normal writing taking clues from the first line.

Regards
Ihtzaz

Posted Image

#97 GhostShip Blue

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Posted 14 September 2011 - 20:46

At the moment, my favorite pens are the Monteverde (bottom sample), the Parker Sonnet my wife bought me (not shown) and my Noodlers with the Esterbrook Medium Stub nib (also not shown).

The fine point in the center is my work pen, a Wing Sung 840 that should be a fine, but writes more like an XF. I use it a lot and, for $2.00, it's a really good value. The top sample is my Lamy with a 1.9mm italic nib. I love the Lamy but both the 1.5 and 1.9 are thick for my tastes. I think my plan is to get another Monteverde with a broad nib and send it out for a regrind. The top sample is either the Monteverde broad (which really write more like a slightly fat medium) or a Wing Sung 1040. I'm not sure why I keep buying Wing Sungs, but they're never terrible and always reasonably priced ao I can feel pretty good about abusing them at work. I bought one of the FPN Stipulas with a flex nib which will be my first flex when it arrives and I'm looking forward to that.
"If you show us a drunk blonde chick in her underwear, she has to die. That's just how we roll." - I wish I knew who to attribute that to. T'weren't me.

Posted Image
Ain't great, but it's the best I've got. So far.


#98 ihtzazqamar

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Posted 15 September 2011 - 13:58

I have used Wing Sung when I was in college. It is amazing they still produce. Several Chinese brands of that era, specially a brand called Kin Sin, are not available now.

#99 pmhudepo

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Posted 16 September 2011 - 07:58

Ihtzaz, I think this is a wonderful writing sample. Great to see how you can maintain x-height when moving from a grid to ruled paper. I still find that quite difficult, though I do suspect some improvement in my own efforts. Love the results of the different pens -- especially the stubs and dip pen. Your Pelikan M400 B seems like a great every day writer, judging by this sample.

Just a touch more consistency and refinement and I would say that it's finished :)

Patrick


Here are a couple of sample sheets I did today. Taking on the advice given, today's practice is to maintain a consistent x height. In the left sheet I used a graph paper and then tried it with the 'waist' line in the right sheet. I have used all of inked pens to see the difference in nib points.

Green lines at the top: Sheaffer Calligraphy nib pen i.e. a stub nib
red lines: Sheaffer M nib
Turquoise lines: Parker 51... I think it is a medium nib
Blue-Black: My regular Pelikan M400, B nib
Black: Newly acquired Eversharp Symphony, XF flexible nib
Green at bottom: Flexible dip pen

My observations:
* This kind of excercise definitely helps. Note that I have included the alphabets which remain between base and waist lines.
* I tend to stay just a shade above the base line... I do not know why though.
* I still skip joins though less frequently.
* Fountain Pen movement mimicking a flex dip pen helps.

I hope this helps some of us. It has helped me.

Regards
Ihtzaz

Posted Image


journaling / tinkering with pens / sailing / photography / software development


#100 pmhudepo

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Posted 16 September 2011 - 08:12

My own morning sessions are currently a mix of practice and journaling -- both on printed guide sheets. While this happened accidentally a week ago, I now make a deliberate choice to do this. Poor Moleskine journal: at first it didn't like my OB nib at all (feathering, bleed-through) and now it has a bunch of guide sheets pasted to its pages.

There appear to be two benefits of this approach. First, using a guide sheet and regarding this as writing practice, I find it a little easier to slow down, collect my thoughts, find out what it is I really want to express and write that down. Second, as I sometimes get carried away and no longer slow down, my practice writing speeds up, but not to the point where it deteriorates into my old scrawl. A bit of a tug of war, but I might just end up with a usable mix of speed and beauty.

In that light, I can definitely see value in writing a line in a formal script like Copperplate and then take clues from it, transfer some of its beauty to your regular writing, as Ihtzaz has been doing.

I have switched inks. Got a little tired of Private Reserve American Blue and have filled my pen with Diamine Syrah: a nice wine-red ink. Still the same pen, Montblanc 146 from 1955 with a 14C OB nib. Guide sheets printed on, I'm afraid, whatever we have in the printer.

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#101 GhostShip Blue

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Posted 16 September 2011 - 18:02

For what it's worth I print my practice sheets on the back of whatever came out of the printer earlier. Yeah, I'm THAT cheap.
"If you show us a drunk blonde chick in her underwear, she has to die. That's just how we roll." - I wish I knew who to attribute that to. T'weren't me.

Posted Image
Ain't great, but it's the best I've got. So far.


#102 krandallkraus

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Posted 17 September 2011 - 01:02

This is one of the best threads I've ever seen here. I'm going to join in soon, but it will only be my regular handwriting. I don't do really fancy stuff like you all. I'm really impressed!
Phone calls last just minutes, emails get deleted, but letters live forever.

#103 ihtzazqamar

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Posted 17 September 2011 - 07:33

This is one of the best threads I've ever seen here. I'm going to join in soon, but it will only be my regular handwriting. I don't do really fancy stuff like you all. I'm really impressed!


Welcome to the thread.
We also post our regular handwriting here. The feed back is good here and we help each other. Participating in this thread gives me enough motivation and reason to practice daily.
Waiting for your post
Ihtzaz

#104 HDoug

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Posted 17 September 2011 - 07:59

Just wanted to say I love this thread!

Doug

#105 ihtzazqamar

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Posted 17 September 2011 - 21:33

Thanks Doug. Please post a sample. Let us see how it goes.

I have mixed my own ink, just for fun. Took 3 parts royal blue, 2 parts red and 3 part of green. All Pelikan inks. Filled my Sheaffer stub pen and gave it a try. This is what I get.

Posted Image

The title line is with a dip pen. The shade is dark as there is more ink on the paper. The paper is new and not good for dip pen. The color comes out to be lighter in my FP. Contrast is also low. I like the color though.

Any idea how to make the color more contrasty? Also I do not know how to name the color?

Regards
Ihtzaz

#106 pmhudepo

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Posted 19 September 2011 - 11:24

Ihtzaz: I wonder if you could use a program like Photoshop to get an idea of the resulting colour of mixed inks? Admittedly, a computer display works by emitting light and ink on paper by reflecting it, so this may not work accurately. It might give you some clues and save a little ink.

I've had a super weekend with a group of great people and we had loads of fun. Sailing, sharing meals, talking, more sailing: wonderful! I decided to spend this morning's writing session on a short recap of the weekend. It definitely brought the fun back into writing sessions. Later on, I'll probably return to writing alphabets and working on specific troublesome parts of my handwriting, but for now, I'm enjoying this too much.

Posted Image


I do not want to mix too many pens and inks on one page, partly because a limited number of variables seems best for practice, but also because the page would become too cluttered. Less is more, to a great extent, I believe.

Patrick

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#107 GhostShip Blue

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Posted 19 September 2011 - 16:33

Take the clue for naming your ink color from the fashion world! They come up with great, fun (although often not very descriptive) names for colors. Nail polish is a great place to start (at least in the US - as the father of 3 teenage girls, believe me, nail polish color names are great!)

The ink manufacturers aren't too bad either - Purple Mojo, Burgundy Mist...

As for a way to make it more contrasty - add a little black. It will probably shift the color a little, but should create a deeper hue that stands off the white a little more. If you have it, or can get it, one of the green-blacks (Noodler's sold one through one of the wet shaving boards - check in the Ink discussions here).

Practice has been thin on the ground of late for me. Not happy about that.
"If you show us a drunk blonde chick in her underwear, she has to die. That's just how we roll." - I wish I knew who to attribute that to. T'weren't me.

Posted Image
Ain't great, but it's the best I've got. So far.


#108 ihtzazqamar

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Posted 19 September 2011 - 17:41

Patrick: Good to know that you had a great weekend. I also visited my village on Saturday. Met my brother and sisters. Did one outdoor cooking, had dinner and then I returned. It is only 1 1/2 hrs away, but a village nevertheless.
When I was mixing a green color, I took a clue from RGB palette. It worked reasonably. But this time, I just mixed few shades. I will try to add some black and see what I get. It should be a small addition of black, I gather.

Slowly, slowly, the copperplate effect is taking over my handwriting...more it shows more motivated I am.

Will post after adjusting the ink color to my liking.

Regards
Ihtzaz

#109 Alpha_Cluster

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 03:11

So I have been meaning to finally start this but I don't feel like I get to actually practice enough. So here is my start. Mostly just me attempting to work on not gripping to hard and just try and write clear and legibly. You can see some cursive and random flurishy letter attempts. As you can see my cursive sticks due to lack of practice (I swear i used to be able to write it nicely just soo slow) but my perfectionist mind prevents me from using it.

So this is my spot... Yeah its a mess.

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Posted Image

And that is my writing. I don't like it right now but its getting better. Mostly I hate how my w's just look like wide u's. Feedback is welcome.

As for the pen its my goto pen (odd as I have a few more expensive pens) which is a Waterman Expert II with Sailor Jentle Epinard ink not my fav but is growing on me.

#110 pmhudepo

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 11:42

Hi Alpha_Cluster, very nice to see a writing sample from you. Improving my handwriting has taken (and continues to take) quite a bit of time, but there is progress and feedback on this website, both of which help a lot.

Here's what I found helpful during the past weeks:

1. Daily practice;
2. Guide sheets;
3. Notice posture and grip;
4. Doodling, sketching, exercises;
5. Slow down.

ad. 1 I like morning writing sessions, before breakfast and work. Let some light into the house, make tea, sit down and write. Sometimes writing alphabets, words starting with the same letter, or focusing on problem areas (e.g., my "cl" and "d" were not distinct enough; the ascenders and descenders on "b, h, k, l and g, j" were short and sloppy). May sound boring, but I actually have come to enjoy these sessions.

ad. 2 Guide sheets make it easier to see your faults, inconsistencies. For instance, I think it would help you to achieve a consistent slant in your writing.

ad. 3 For me, a tight grip and a slightly hunched posture were linked to writing -- I have maximum control (but minimum sustainability) that way, particularly when writing small. Relaxing causes my writing to become wobbly, but I feel I will be able to maintain that relaxed state over far longer periods. That is important if I want to continu to journal and write letters. (Which I do.)

As far as the tripod grip goes, this thread and this specific message in a different thread really helped me.

ad. 4 Doodling, sketching etc, for me, are not linked to tight grip and hunched posture. So if I feel I get cramped, I grab a scrap of paper and make some silly, curvy, wavy thingies and slowly inch towards real letters again. Circled letters and various other "silly stuff" in this thread. I get to use my pen, become more familiar with its size, shape, weight, nib sweet spot, without cramping up.

ad. 5 Slowing down might not be good for note-taking, but for practice, who cares? It can take me 30 minutes just to complete one printed guide sheet with beautiful letters (this includes the scrap paper scribbles). I do feel a need to speed things up a little, because at this pace, I won't be able to keep up with my penpals, journaling or use it for note-taking at work. That's a next step for me.

As far as your letter 'w' is concerned, try writing an entire page of them. See examples in this threa and others, and pick a few forms you like. Maybe a sharp form, like on a computer's keyboard or a round form like, well, a pair of buttocks :) Try some, see what fits with the letters you do already like. Write large, write small, write slowly.

Edited by pmhudepo, 21 September 2011 - 11:51.

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#111 ihtzazqamar

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 17:10

Hello Alpha_Cluster
Good to see a new sample in the thread. Participate enough and you will see improvements. You may check http://www.iampeth.com/lessons.php . Here you will find standard lessons which are very helpful. The first step in all of them is learning the fundamental pen strokes, like straight lines, circles, ovals, maintaining a consistent height and maintaining a consistent slant.
Slowing down is a must to start. Learn how to 'form' letters. Writing bigger than usual also helps.
etc. etc.


Good luck


ihtzaz

#112 ihtzazqamar

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 19:53

My today's practice sheet.
As suggested, have added some blank ink to my mix. It is a better shade now.
Alpha_Cluster: You may compare my first post in this thread and the following post. You can see the difference. Thanks to the participants of this thread.

Ihtzaz

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#113 dreupee

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 03:12

Ihtzaz,

That is some very beautiful writing.

I've been practicing the beginning of the Palmer method and today I learned that the x height is 1/16th of an inch. Wow! That is small!

I created a practice guide sheet based on the text of the method and it's not as bad as I thought it would be.

A fine nib looks a bit fat at this height.

Drew

#114 Alpha_Cluster

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 04:59

I actually got some French rule notebooks for practice but I always feel odd writing big. Anyone have anything that helped them worry less about the height of there letters? I dont know why but it feels odd writing in wide ruled notebooks.

#115 pmhudepo

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 11:54

I actually got some French rule notebooks for practice but I always feel odd writing big. Anyone have anything that helped them worry less about the height of there letters? I dont know why but it feels odd writing in wide ruled notebooks.


On the IAMPETH website you can find lessons and guide sheets.

I am using a guide sheet made by Achim -- you can find it here. It is designed for Spencerian script, so it may not be suited to every script. Quite a bit of slant, and only 13 lines on A4-sized paper.

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#116 pmhudepo

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 12:04

Wanted to add: with only 13 lines per page, line spacing is huge, but I do think it looks nicer, especially if you want large ascenders and descenders.

Posted Image

I'll probably want to end up with something in between the two, with a large enough line spacing to keep descenders from touching the ascenders of the next line.

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#117 aquariusamethyst

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 00:13

Some great writing samples here. I'll try to post some of my cursive writing here too.

#118 pmhudepo

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 12:55

Some great writing samples here. I'll try to post some of my cursive writing here too.


Thanks! Looking forward to seeing your samples. I often pick up ideas, either to use as practice or to emulate / integrate into my own writing.

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#119 subbes

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 13:45

(wrong place.)

Edited by subbes, 23 September 2011 - 18:39.

"Perdita thought, to take an example at random, that things like table manners were a stupid and repressive idea. Agnes, on the other hand, was against being hit by flying bits of other people's cabbage." (Pratchett, T. Carpe Jugulum.)

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#120 ihtzazqamar

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 20:36

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