Jump to content


Photo

Inks With A "sheen"


  • Please log in to reply
484 replies to this topic

#481 amberleadavis

amberleadavis

    Inky! En-Abe-Lawyer

  • FPN Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19,211 posts
  • Location:Las Vegas
  • Flag:

Posted 21 March 2015 - 21:02

Thanks for showing these side by side. I didn't realise 24-48 hour evaporation would make such a significant difference.

 

WOW, the difference is remarkable.


When I grow up, I want to be a great lawyer. Until then, I practice. - A.Davis

.

If you want to know about my ever changing Avatar, check out this thread.

.

Borrow a TWSBI?  

.

Borrow an Estie?

 

fpn_1424623518__super_pinks-bottle%20res


#482 Nomad

Nomad

    Dipped Only

  • Member - Gold

  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 22 March 2015 - 03:23

Pretty much any ink that is left to dry on a nonabsorbent surface such as glass or mylar and that can produce a translucent film will show "sheen." That's why you'll observe sheen on the underside of your nib feed, on the inside of ink bottle caps and the rims of ink bottle mouths. I believe the effect is due to thin film interference, to which we also owe the iridescence of soap bubbles.

This means the critical factor involved in producing sheen is not the type of ink but the substrate. Even blue-black Quink will produce a red sheen on the back of a plastic ruler but will be devoid of glow on ordinary writing paper.

I suspect the reason that ink left exposed in a dish produces more sheen is because evaporation has caused it to grow stickier and, therefore, less easily absorbed by the paper.



#483 Goudy

Goudy

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 57 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 22 March 2015 - 10:38

Pretty much any ink that is left to dry on a nonabsorbent surface such as glass or mylar and that can produce a translucent film will show "sheen." That's why you'll observe sheen on the underside of your nib feed, on the inside of ink bottle caps and the rims of ink bottle mouths. I believe the effect is due to thin film interference, to which we also owe the iridescence of soap bubbles.

This means the critical factor involved in producing sheen is not the type of ink but the substrate. Even blue-black Quink will produce a red sheen on the back of a plastic ruler but will be devoid of glow on ordinary writing paper.

 

Interesting. I hadn't thought of trying the experiment on different types of paper. I was using Rhodia Ivory High Grade Vellum (90g/m2), which is coated to resist feathering. Maybe that coating is contributing to the thin film interference.

 

I suspect the reason that ink left exposed in a dish produces more sheen is because evaporation has caused it to grow stickier and, therefore, less easily absorbed by the paper.

 

After 72 hours evaporation, what's left of my Yama-budo puddle is now too viscous to flow in a fountain pen feed, or even work well on a dip nib. So there does seem to be a trade-off between sheen and usability. The optimum point for this particular ink seems to be about 2 days of evaporation, at which point the sheen is brightest and the ink still flows freely enough to be usable.



#484 mongrelnomad

mongrelnomad

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,600 posts

Posted 22 March 2015 - 12:50

A few more with sheen (sorry, no onion paper here)...

 

Ishida Bunga Hakodate Twilight (red sheen):

 

16706388469_986a5dc56c_b.jpg

 

Sailor Oku-Yama (gold sheen):

 

16891554251_f025ce3a59_b.jpg


Too many pens; too little writing.

#485 Uncial

Uncial

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 420 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 24 March 2015 - 21:01

I don't know if my Yama Budo has evaporated any (never left it with the cap off), but its always sheened like crazy for me. It's most noticeable on Tomoe. If I even tilt the page slightly it appears as a solid gold sheening line. I do use it in very, very wet nibs though and have noticed that it is a very different ink in a dry nib.