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What Type Of Pen Is This Man Using?


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#1 gnomore

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 18:39

I have a fountain pen that I write with regularly, and am desiring to attempt to learn this mans craft. His video has inspired me. I am trying to figure out what type of dip pen this guys is using. Not the exact one, but the style. Where do I find a dip pen that flexes like that? It looks like there is a point to the pen, and his thick lines are made by pushing down harder. My feeble attempts at finding out what type of pen this gentleman uses have come to no result so I figured I would open the question to the experts here.

Here is a link to the video.



Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thank You


ps. I have a duplicate post in penmanship but this is obviously the correct forum for this question. If a mod could delete it as I could not figure out how to.

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#2 USMCMom

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 18:45

He's using a dip pen with a flexible nib.

#3 gnomore

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 18:48

He's using a dip pen with a flexible nib.


Any idea what nib he is using?

#4 USMCMom

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 18:59

I'm not experienced enough to even guess! LOL We have members who are very experienced and knowledgeable and they might know. I'm just getting ready to begin learning Copperplate.

#5 Pensfan

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 19:09

Cool video.... and very educational!

But wow, six minutes to write one word?? That is why I can't write in copperplate. I can hardly slow myself down enough to write Calligraphy in less than six seconds.

haha
this year, or this month, or, more likely, this very day, we have failed to practice ourselves the kind of behavior we expect from other people.
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#6 uzkntuocmw

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 19:41

Ouch. You can hear the nib scraping as if it's going to either snap or spray ink everywhere. Some people can just about write with flex nibs, and some flex nibs aren't utterly awful if held at an exactly perfect angle with an exactly perfect pressure, but this shows neither... There's a reason flex nibs are hard to find these days.

#7 gnomore

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 19:52

Ouch. You can hear the nib scraping as if it's going to either snap or spray ink everywhere. Some people can just about write with flex nibs, and some flex nibs aren't utterly awful if held at an exactly perfect angle with an exactly perfect pressure, but this shows neither... There's a reason flex nibs are hard to find these days.


Yeah I emailed his address at the end of the video, hopefully he responds. That scraping sound is oddly pleasing for some reason. Sounds similar to an actual quill.

#8 joshk

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 19:57

At the end of other videos I believe it says a Brause N69, but I could be mistaken about the number.

#9 Mickey

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 20:04

At the end of other videos I believe it says a Brause N69, but I could be mistaken about the number.


I think it's an 86.

Edited by Mickey, 26 April 2011 - 20:04.

The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public; to forbid this, is to destroy the freedom of the press; but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity. (4 Bl. Com. 151, 152.) Blackstone's Commentaries


#10 uzkntuocmw

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 20:24

That scraping sound is oddly pleasing for some reason. Sounds similar to an actual quill.

It's the sound of a nib being tortured. Think of it as the snapping of bones as an evil tyrant marches over a pit of undernourished babies.

#11 Bugg

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 06:47

That scraping sound is oddly pleasing for some reason. Sounds similar to an actual quill.

It's the sound of a nib being tortured. Think of it as the snapping of bones as an evil tyrant marches over a pit of undernourished babies.


Not so sure about this one. You can hear some scratching before the nib even hits the paper, as if the music was dubbed from a record-player. It's evident that he's practice by the way he writes. It could be that he's misusing the nib, but dip-nibs have a tendency to catch paper much more easily than fountain pen nibs. You can definitely hear the nib catching on the up-stroke on the "O." It could be he's torturing the nib, or that its just catching on the paper. I have nibs, which make a similar sound just under the weight of the holder, while others, all things being equal, don't.

Like I said, could be his use of the nib, but could be other reasons.

#12 Mickey

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 13:30

That scraping sound is oddly pleasing for some reason. Sounds similar to an actual quill.

It's the sound of a nib being tortured. Think of it as the snapping of bones as an evil tyrant marches over a pit of undernourished babies.


Not so sure about this one. You can hear some scratching before the nib even hits the paper, as if the music was dubbed from a record-player. It's evident that he's practice by the way he writes. It could be that he's misusing the nib, but dip-nibs have a tendency to catch paper much more easily than fountain pen nibs. You can definitely hear the nib catching on the up-stroke on the "O." It could be he's torturing the nib, or that its just catching on the paper. I have nibs, which make a similar sound just under the weight of the holder, while others, all things being equal, don't.

Like I said, could be his use of the nib, but could be other reasons.


These days, nibs like the Brause 86 are more often used in oblique holders, though skilled penmen, like the one in this video, can do wonderful work using a straight holder. The big downside of the straight holder is that one tine tends to drag more than the other and chatter. This can create a rough edge, which may be left as part of the penman's design or smoothed out later, as Hamid Raza Abrahimi does frequently in these videos. I think the man is amazing, not just for the beauty of his work but for the sureness of his hand.

The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public; to forbid this, is to destroy the freedom of the press; but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity. (4 Bl. Com. 151, 152.) Blackstone's Commentaries


#13 gnomore

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 04:54

I looked all over for the Brause 86 nib. Seems like they stopped making them? Anyone know where I can get one?

#14 ToasterPastry

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 06:33

I wouldn't focus so much on the nib and the holder as practice of the technique. Nibs and holders are cheap. Time and practice is expensive.
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#15 fuchsiaprincess

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 09:36

Perhaps this thread will help.

Edited by fuchsiaprincess, 28 April 2011 - 09:40.

Posted Image Posted Image


#16 corniche

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 10:03

I wouldn't focus so much on the nib and the holder as practice of the technique. Nibs and holders are cheap. Time and practice is expensive.


Hello gnomore,

If you pause the video at the end- he gives the following credits:

- Brause & Co. Marbled Pen Holder
- Brause & Co. #86 Nib
- Persian Traditional Calligraphy Ink, Black
- Persian Leather Pasteboard with Steinbach pasteboard sheet

However, that said, I think Toaster Pastry raises a valid point; you can get equal results with a Speedball pen holder and nib if you practice long enough. ;)

All the best & good luck,

Sean :)

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#17 Mickey

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 14:45

I looked all over for the Brause 86 nib. Seems like they stopped making them? Anyone know where I can get one?


The Brause 76 (The Rose) is readily available and it is nearly as flexible, I'd say more flexible than most mere mortals can handle reliably. (Executing a simple pull stroke without spreading the tines takes practice.) I've got a bunch of them (found them on sale and couldn't resist), but they don't see much use (yet). I will, however, load one up every once in a while to remind me how much more I need to practice.

The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public; to forbid this, is to destroy the freedom of the press; but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity. (4 Bl. Com. 151, 152.) Blackstone's Commentaries


#18 Randal6393

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 18:38

gnomore,

OK, here is my oft-written list of tools used to practice/write any formal cursive, such as Spenserian or Copperplate/Engrosser's script.

The best work is done with an oblique elbow nib holder. Cost anywhere from $4.00 or so to $35.00 - 40.00. I prefer the Blackwell wood oblique holder because it is comfortable and will easily hold almost any size nib, from the very small to very large. Runs right around $40.00 but will last you forever. The tip is angled to minimize the tendency of a pointed nib to catch on paper.

Nibs for flexible writing -- should have an assortment and find out which one you like best. Run from less than a dollar to about $2.50 each, get three of each style for a good trial. Then buy the ones you like by the dozen. The standard practice nib is the Gillott 303. Other nibs that are often used are the Brause Rose (76), Brause EF, Leonardt Principal EF, Hiro 40 (Blue Pumpkin), Gillott 170, Gillott 290, Gillott 404, Hunt 101. There are several others -- including vintage nibs, which cost only a few pennies more than modern nibs. Many calligraphers swear by the older nibs.

Ink -- practice is often done with Higgins Eternal. Most of the Sumi liquid inks are also usable for flex calligraphy. For finish work, IMHO, nothing beats Old World Iron Gall or McCaffrey's Penman ink. Ink should always be adjusted to work with your pen and paper by adding distilled water to replace water lost to evaporation. Also, a bottle of gum arabica AKA acacia gum AKA myrrh is essential to produce the clear, sharp hairlines and prevent feathering. (Never use ink treated with gum arabica in a fountain pen -- will gum the feed up badly unless cleaned out after each session.)

Paper, for practice, a good, bright white copy paper works well. Guidelines either on the paper itself or on a sheet under the paper work well. At first, on the paper makes it easier to insure correct angles and sizing. Copperplate practice pads are available from some suppliers.

Lessons are available from IAMPETH in various styles of cursive. Material may be obtained from John Neal, Bookseller in the U. S. As well as several other online sites.

Happy hunting,

Edited by Randal6393, 28 April 2011 - 18:39.

Yours,
Randal

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#19 Mickey

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 19:25

All good advice. Randal. I'd add the Hourglass Adjustable to the recommended holder list. I've got a Blackwell, too. Both are great holders.

On guide sheets: if you choose to print your own, print the lines in any color other than black, It makes seeing your own lines a lot easier, especially the cut-offs.

The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public; to forbid this, is to destroy the freedom of the press; but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity. (4 Bl. Com. 151, 152.) Blackstone's Commentaries


#20 alvarez57

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 04:23

I wouldn't focus so much on the nib and the holder as practice of the technique. Nibs and holders are cheap. Time and practice is expensive.



Are you so right on that one!

sonia alvarez

 

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