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Parker 75 Fountain Pen


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#1 dreale

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Posted 03 April 2011 - 01:28

Hello! I am new to the network, and since I was young, always was interested in the Parker 75. How good a pen is it? (I currently have 4 Watermans, three are Phileas, one is a Writer II). Thank you!

#2 jar

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Posted 03 April 2011 - 01:58

It is a very, very good pen, slim compared to those you have though.

How pierceful grows the hazy yon! How myrtle petaled thou! For spring hath sprung the cyclotron - How high browse thou, brown cow? -- Churchy LaFemme, 1950

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#3 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 00:25

I have a sterling silver cross hatched one; called cisele. Well I bought mine in 1970 before the French name came along.

It is IMO a perfectly balanced metal pen, light and as Jars mentioned thin.

If you hold your pen with your forefinger up instead of a death grip that will not matter.

The French version has a round section, the American version a triangular section.

You can turn the nib, setting it so it is canted. I tried that but 95% of the time write with it set 'normal'.

The Aeromatic (sp) the original rubber sac in the metal spring filler on mine is still good. I'd forgotten it can take cartridges, and I bought mine before there were converters.
So it's a triple threat for filling.

It's one of the 10 pens everyone should have one of, like the P-51, an Estie, a Snorkel and so on.

Semi-flex is an “almost” flex; not a ‘flex’ nib. It is great for regular writing. It can give you some fancy; but it is not made for real fancy writing. For that get a 'flexi' or a "flex" nib.

"

 

Wider than Normal does not exist. Wider than Japanese does. Every company has it's very own standard + slop/tolerance. Developed from the users of it's pens only; not the users of other companies pens. The size you grind a nib to, is your standard only. Paper and ink matter to nib width. Thank god for 1/2 sizes or it would be boring.


#4 Blade Runner

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 00:33

Very nice pen. I used the original American version exclusively for years. It developed a leak between the section and the section ring. From speaking to 75 enthusiasts, this is not an uncommon issue. It can be repaired or replaced.

#5 WendyNC

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 00:40

It's a wonderful pen--got me through college, long, long ago. It's a little small for my aging hands, but I still love mine.
I came here for the pictures and stayed for the conversation.

#6 andybiotic

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Posted 07 April 2011 - 16:50

Hello! I am new to the network, and since I was young, always was interested in the Parker 75. How good a pen is it? (I currently have 4 Watermans, three are Phileas, one is a Writer II). Thank you!


I have a question, I am interested in getting a Parker 75 as well and I recently came across a crosshatch sterling silver one from France (14K nib) which has a thin gold band on the section above the nib as oppose to a big/thick silver band. I believe that it is a later model where Parker has modified it to stop ink staining etc...

My question is: How much does it worth compare to the older models? I.e. thin gold band vs. thick silver or gold band on a Parker 75... or does it matter at all?

It seems to have very few examples on the web and they are all inconsistent, either people don't know the difference between the bands and price them the same or that people don't know their worth altogether...

Thanks in advance!
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#7 jar

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Posted 07 April 2011 - 16:54


Hello! I am new to the network, and since I was young, always was interested in the Parker 75. How good a pen is it? (I currently have 4 Watermans, three are Phileas, one is a Writer II). Thank you!


I have a question, I am interested in getting a Parker 75 as well and I recently came across a crosshatch sterling silver one from France (14K nib) which has a thin gold band on the section above the nib as oppose to a big/thick silver band. I believe that it is a later model where Parker has modified it to stop ink staining etc...

My question is: How much does it worth compare to the older models? I.e. thin gold band vs. thick silver or gold band on a Parker 75... or does it matter at all?

It seems to have very few examples on the web and they are all inconsistent, either people don't know the difference between the bands and price them the same or that people don't know their worth altogether...

Thanks in advance!


I would not expect a price difference based on that.

How pierceful grows the hazy yon! How myrtle petaled thou! For spring hath sprung the cyclotron - How high browse thou, brown cow? -- Churchy LaFemme, 1950

Anyone so limited that they can only spell a word one way suffers a severe handicap. -- jar

The last pen I bought will be the next to last pen I ever buy! --jar


#8 nxn96

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Posted 07 April 2011 - 17:38

The Parker 75 is a pen I can't get myself to like as much as I think I should. I've had a few of them over the years, starting with the Cisele that was one of my first "good pen" purchases many years ago (live long enough and your "new" pen becomes "vintage"...). It is a rather thin profile, but as others have noted, it has a nice "feel" and balance such that the overall size shouldn't matter unless you are really into oversized pens.

Despite having used one for years, it always struck me as a "hard" writer prone to scatchiness and hard to start. In retrospect, I've wondered if part of the problem was that I was using cartridges back then and was not as good about flushing and cleaning as I should have been. I've thought about pulling my old Cisele out and trying it again, but thus far the interest isn't there.

One particular "gripe" I have had with the pen is that the section seemed to shrink over time such that it would not stay tightly screwed into the barrel. Parker did replace the section once, and when it happened again a few years later, I self-repaired it by wrapping some Teflon tape around the section threads. I've read elsewhere that this is not an uncommon situation with the 75, but I'll leave it to others to confirm or dispute that.

The Sterling Ciseles are what most people think of when they think of a 75. However, they seldom come cheap and most seem to go for a pretty penny on eBay. By comparison, I think the Flighter (Stainless) 75's go for a bit less money on eBay if you're looking to save a few dollars.

Overall, in spite of my own issues with the pen, the 75 is one of the "iconic" Parkers. As such, you'll always be able to find a willing buyer for one if you decide down the road that your interests lie elsewhere

#9 WendyNC

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Posted 07 April 2011 - 17:50

Hello! I am new to the network, and since I was young, always was interested in the Parker 75. How good a pen is it? (I currently have 4 Watermans, three are Phileas, one is a Writer II). Thank you!


I've only had mine since 1974 and it was boxed up for more years than I care to admit, but it's the pen that went to and all the way through college with me. Although it's a little small for my aging hands, it's my smoothest nib, thanks to all the miles of notes written with it. Even if it's not in the rotation all the time, I don't see myself giving it up anytime soon.
I came here for the pictures and stayed for the conversation.

#10 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 07 April 2011 - 21:47

Spare nibs run about $75 but there are them to be had in different flexes and widths. I will one day stumble across a $75 dollar bill and get a more flexible nib.

Semi-flex is an “almost” flex; not a ‘flex’ nib. It is great for regular writing. It can give you some fancy; but it is not made for real fancy writing. For that get a 'flexi' or a "flex" nib.

"

 

Wider than Normal does not exist. Wider than Japanese does. Every company has it's very own standard + slop/tolerance. Developed from the users of it's pens only; not the users of other companies pens. The size you grind a nib to, is your standard only. Paper and ink matter to nib width. Thank god for 1/2 sizes or it would be boring.


#11 Ron Z

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Posted 07 April 2011 - 23:06

The 75 is a world apart from your Phileas, which isn't even in the same league IMHO (and I own or have owned both)

The Parker 75 replaced the VP in the Parker lineup around 1964-65. The sterling grid pattern is the iconic model which continued in production until the very end in the 1990s. As Bo Bo mentioned, there are a couple of different versions of the pen. The early ones are the triangular sections, later ones have the round section, which have thin stem feeds (triangular section) and thick stem feeds with the collector attached instead of built into the section. The earlier ones have the thick ring on the end of the section, with numbers on it as indicators to where you have the nib rotated - a carry over from the VP. Later ones have the thin band on the end. I don't think that effects value.

The problem with the thick ring is that the ring tended to corrode on the inside, and ink would ooze to the back end. I would think that thread sealant would take care of that. You do find them with plastic that has shrunk, or threads that are worn. Replacement sections in both varieties are available, but cost a pretty penny!

There was a version made with metal threads, but the plastic was thin where the metal and plastic meet, and tended to break. Parker abandoned the design in favor of all plastic threads. The other problem that you may encounter are the clutch fingers. The original versions had a short inner cap and metal clutch fingers. They later went to a long inner cap with ridges in it to act as the clutch. These wear, and to repair it we go back to the short inner cap with the metal clutch fingers.

IMO a great pen. I have 5 in the collection, and have had all of them in use at one time or another. I would expect to pay $150 and up for one in excellent condition, depending on the finish. A pen of the earlier flat top version would be more expensive more expensive than the later dished top.


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#12 Blade Runner

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Posted 08 April 2011 - 03:18

The problem with the later production 75 with the thin gold trim at the end of the section is that the gold trim is very prone to corrosion.

Edited by Blade Runner, 08 April 2011 - 03:19.


#13 andybiotic

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Posted 08 April 2011 - 06:31

The problem with the later production 75 with the thin gold trim at the end of the section is that the gold trim is very prone to corrosion.



Really? I thought, from some readings on the net and from Ron Z's reply up there, that it is the thicker ring versions that are prone to corrosion...? I thought Parker realises the corrosion problem have been happening to the older versions / thicker rings 75s and thats the whole reason why they have re-designed it to have a thinner ring on the section... is it not?

If both the thin and the thick ones are prone to corrosion then.... thumbs down for Parker?!
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#14 nxn96

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Posted 08 April 2011 - 16:54

Something I don't recall having been brought up yet is the fact that the Parker 75 is a particularly popular pen for counterfeiters; not unlike other pens whose popularity has continued long after production ended. While "know your seller" is always good advice, it's particularly apt to keep that in mind here.