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Taking Apart A Lady Sheaffer


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#1 The Royal Pen

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Posted 03 August 2010 - 03:23

Well, a Lady Sheaffer Skripselect (I think that's the name) is clogged!
It also has a hole near the tip of the nib. Now, I got this at an antique store for only $12, and I don''t mind paying that much for a pen, and so I bought it.

How can I take it apart? I haven't discovered a way. I don't know how I can get at
the feed.

Does anyone here know? I also needs to kno how I can repair that hole near athe top of the nib.

I haven't alot of experience with this type of pen.
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#2 discplayer

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Posted 03 August 2010 - 03:44

Good luck on this topic. I've got a similar question regarding a Lady Sheaffer Skripcert III. I'm wondering if that's the same model you are talking about. Hooded nib, no clip, slim. Do you a pic to post?
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#3 watch_art

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Posted 03 August 2010 - 03:49

Give me pictures and I'll figger sumthin out!
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#4 viclip

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Posted 03 August 2010 - 11:37

Marshall & Oldfield deal with the Lady Sheaffer in their book "Pen Repair" at page 105 (1st edition). Assuming you have the same or similar model, the nib is held in the front section/hood/shell with a plastic retaining plug which can be unscrewed using a 4 mm. hex key. But there's a slight complication ~ the pierce tube of the feed goes thru the hole in the middle of the plug so the hex key won't enter! The solution is to drill a hole in the end of the hex key to hollow it out such that the pierce tube internally enters the drilled-out key while the outside of the key engages the retainer. With the plug/seal screwed out & removed, the feed/nib assembly can then be removed by pushing the assembly inwards; soaking & gentle pulling may also help assist the coaxing process.

Note that quality hex keys are hardened & difficult to drill. Try grinding or filing off some of the end to remove the most hardened area thereby exposing the less hardened interior portion of the key for drilling. You could also buy a cheap imported hex key which hasn't been hardened & will drill easily, being one of the few situations when buying junk tools makes sense.

As an alternative, the authors also refer to making a "spiked" tube to grip the retaining plug without disturbing the pierce tube; they don't elaborate but claim that this is similar to removing Onoto seals. But then they proceed to recommend using the hollowed-out hex key method because the "spiked" tube can chew up the plug seal & may also damage the pierce tube!

Personally I'd go for the hollowed out hex key method. Plus once you've made the special tool, you'll be able to play with Lady Sheaffer's for decades to come...hope this helps

#5 The Royal Pen

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Posted 03 August 2010 - 14:18

Here is a picture
(The picture isn't mine, though, my camera won't work)

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Edited by The Royal Pen, 03 August 2010 - 14:21.

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#6 lws

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 09:19

Here is a picture
(The picture isn't mine, though, my camera won't work)


Do you mean one of these?
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Marshall & Oldfield deal with the Lady Sheaffer in their book "Pen Repair" at page 105 (1st edition). Assuming you have the same or similar model, the nib is held in the front section/hood/shell with a plastic retaining plug which can be unscrewed using a 4 mm. hex key. But there's a slight complication ~ the pierce tube of the feed goes thru the hole in the middle of the plug so the hex key won't enter! The solution is to drill a hole in the end of the hex key to hollow it out such that the pierce tube internally enters the drilled-out key while the outside of the key engages the retainer. With the plug/seal screwed out & removed, the feed/nib assembly can then be removed by pushing the assembly inwards; soaking & gentle pulling may also help assist the coaxing process.

Note that quality hex keys are hardened & difficult to drill. Try grinding or filing off some of the end to remove the most hardened area thereby exposing the less hardened interior portion of the key for drilling. You could also buy a cheap imported hex key which hasn't been hardened & will drill easily, being one of the few situations when buying junk tools makes sense.

As an alternative, the authors also refer to making a "spiked" tube to grip the retaining plug without disturbing the pierce tube; they don't elaborate but claim that this is similar to removing Onoto seals. But then they proceed to recommend using the hollowed-out hex key method because the "spiked" tube can chew up the plug seal & may also damage the pierce tube!

Personally I'd go for the hollowed out hex key method. Plus once you've made the special tool, you'll be able to play with Lady Sheaffer's for decades to come...hope this helps


Assuming in turn that the OP has one of the pens as shown in my photographs, there's no hole for a hex key there.

Can anyone give a definite ID on this pen, and for bonus points, disassembly instructions? :)

Edit: Apparently it doesn't have a unique name, but is best described as a Sheaffer Cartridge Pen / Skripsert with 'Stylpoint' nib. See: This post, or this 1950's ad.

- Lewis.

Edited by lws, 06 August 2010 - 10:10.

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#7 viclip

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 10:53


Here is a picture
(The picture isn't mine, though, my camera won't work)


Do you mean one of these?
Posted Image

Marshall & Oldfield deal with the Lady Sheaffer in their book "Pen Repair" at page 105 (1st edition). Assuming you have the same or similar model, the nib is held in the front section/hood/shell with a plastic retaining plug which can be unscrewed using a 4 mm. hex key. But there's a slight complication ~ the pierce tube of the feed goes thru the hole in the middle of the plug so the hex key won't enter! The solution is to drill a hole in the end of the hex key to hollow it out such that the pierce tube internally enters the drilled-out key while the outside of the key engages the retainer. With the plug/seal screwed out & removed, the feed/nib assembly can then be removed by pushing the assembly inwards; soaking & gentle pulling may also help assist the coaxing process.

Note that quality hex keys are hardened & difficult to drill. Try grinding or filing off some of the end to remove the most hardened area thereby exposing the less hardened interior portion of the key for drilling. You could also buy a cheap imported hex key which hasn't been hardened & will drill easily, being one of the few situations when buying junk tools makes sense.

As an alternative, the authors also refer to making a "spiked" tube to grip the retaining plug without disturbing the pierce tube; they don't elaborate but claim that this is similar to removing Onoto seals. But then they proceed to recommend using the hollowed-out hex key method because the "spiked" tube can chew up the plug seal & may also damage the pierce tube!

Personally I'd go for the hollowed out hex key method. Plus once you've made the special tool, you'll be able to play with Lady Sheaffer's for decades to come...hope this helps


Assuming in turn that the OP has one of the pens as shown in my photographs, there's no hole for a hex key there.

Can anyone give a definite ID on this pen, and for bonus points, disassembly instructions? :)

Edit: Apparently it doesn't have a unique name, but is best described as a Sheaffer Cartridge Pen / Skripsert with 'Stylpoint' nib. See: This post, or this 1950's ad.

- Lewis.


It may very well be that newer &/or economy models even if based on the Lady Sheaffer chassis, are not amenable to being disassembled except with the application of extreme prejudice with the intent of salvaging parts. It wouldn't surprise me if lower-end items were simply glued together commencing in the 1960s or 1970s as a precursor to the completely disposable paradigm which has regrettably evolved.

In their discussion of the "Modern Sheaffer" at page 107 of the said Pen Repair book, the aforesaid authors indicate that in dealing with pens less than 40 years old, "Most Sheaffer nib units are sold as units that cannot be dismantled. Perhaps 'should not be dismantled' is a better way of looking at it! Most can be taken apart to provide the point...".

In the worst case scenario, if anyone has a junker lying around, much could be learned from "reverse engineering" it...

#8 79spitfire

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 13:12

If you find that there is a hex key socket down in there someplace you may have luck with what's called a "security" bit, it already has the hole in the end. It may be easier to grind/drill it deeper.

Did you try just flushing out the nib unit with a syringe or bulb? A good soak and thorough flushing may just fix it!

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#9 viclip

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 13:53

If you find that there is a hex key socket down in there someplace you may have luck with what's called a "security" bit, it already has the hole in the end. It may be easier to grind/drill it deeper.

Did you try just flushing out the nib unit with a syringe or bulb? A good soak and thorough flushing may just fix it!


Thx for the tip. I have a "security" set but until now had never explored the hex bits in it.
They are indeed hollowed out already thus making it easy to elongate the hole if need be.
My set doesn't include the 4 mm size however the 5/32" one is pretty close & could very well pass
for a 4 mm.

I noticed that the 5/32 security hex bit (aka Allen wrench key) is fairly small & that the inner hole
takes up much of its body. It could be easy to mistake a dimly lit hole around the pen's pierce tube
as being round instead of 6-sided due to the small sizes at play exacerbated with some dried ink, pocket
lint or whatever camoflauging the interior corners of the hex hole in the retainer plug. And hopefully
the assembler at the factory didn't apply too much force & "round out" the hole (it's just plastic!).

#10 lws

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 03:38

It may very well be that newer &/or economy models even if based on the Lady Sheaffer chassis, are not amenable to being disassembled except with the application of extreme prejudice with the intent of salvaging parts. It wouldn't surprise me if lower-end items were simply glued together commencing in the 1960s or 1970s as a precursor to the completely disposable paradigm which has regrettably evolved.

In their discussion of the "Modern Sheaffer" at page 107 of the said Pen Repair book, the aforesaid authors indicate that in dealing with pens less than 40 years old, "Most Sheaffer nib units are sold as units that cannot be dismantled. Perhaps 'should not be dismantled' is a better way of looking at it! Most can be taken apart to provide the point...".

In the worst case scenario, if anyone has a junker lying around, much could be learned from "reverse engineering" it...


Unfortunately, I like all of mine too much to destructively reverse-engineer them. :( Unlike the regular 'school pens', which have variable-quality nibs, these semi-hooded nib pens always seem to be superb writers.

edit: I have tried to dismantle them by force, but there's no give in any of the components (nothing seems to unscrew or pull out.) I have an odd suspicion that the collector and feed assembly is glued into the hood.

Edited by lws, 08 August 2010 - 07:04.

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#11 The Royal Pen

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Posted 02 September 2010 - 21:42

UPDATE!!!
The thing was beaten up by the past user. I think that he got the idea of interting green ink WITH SHELLAC into a Skrip cartridge! The horror! And to make matters even worse, the nib partially rot off!(all the way down to the top of the feed) So, Now I am left with a very scratchy and uneven BBBBB nib. Thanks for the tips, though. This only happenes recently--I don't think it may be worth the trouble. They are common around here, so I don't think it will be too much trouble to find another one. Thanks!

Edited by The Royal Pen, 02 September 2010 - 21:44.

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