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Parker Penman Sapphire - Bottle


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#1 Sandy1

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 04:18

Kindly adjust the brightness & contrast of your monitor to accurately depict this Gray Scale.

As the patches are neutral gray, the colour on your monitor should also be neutral.


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Higher Resolution Scan - taken from blocked text on page 1.
Intended to show feathering and shading.
Posted Image


Ink Review : Parker Penman Sapphire. March 29-30, 2010. By Sandy1

Paper: Clairefontaine 'Triomphe' - Page 1.
Swabs:
  • Waterman 'Florida Blue'.
  • Parker 'Penman Sapphire'.
  • Private Reserve 'American Blue'
This Review is mostly to show how PPS is or is not changing over time. The nearly-full bottle is sound - no crud on the threads. The ink is transparent & clear. There was no sediment, slime, floaters or swimmers. No strange smells were noticed. So the ink does not show gross physical deterioration. It seems that preservation is due, in part, to the use of a solid plastic seal/liner in the cap - no cheap coated bit of cardstock that top-tier ink makers (you know who, Pilot!) still get away with. The writing experience is beyond mere words. I am using the same pen & nib that I used when I 1st used this ink: a Parker Duofold with a factory stock 18K -M- nib. |||///=@ ^. Nothing rare or exotic. As some may know, I usually include of a number of pens in my Reviews. This shall be an

Paper: G Lalo 'Verge de France' - Page 2.

exception as I don't feel like expending ink on [feed] floods & clean-up. Oh this is the white G. Lalo with an off-white warm base tint. This paper 'swallows' the luster of this ink. Perhaps it'll look better when the ink dries.
* I wanted to mention that there's been attempts to replicate this ink. I salute those who have slaved over the mixing cauldrons & vats. I think that intangibles of this ink make it so unique. Properties that I rather doubt will or can be conveyed in a mere scan: rather akin to photographing an oil painting.

Paper: Rhodia unlined; #18 pad - Page 3.

Now we have the unlined Rhodia, taken from their #18 pad. So it may not be 100% equivalent to papers that are printed with various lines.
So let's do some Ink review stuff:
Smear Test: No smear at 12 seconds. [Pool at the end of the downstroke finally dried]
Flow: A bit wet.
Nib Dry-out: OK starting after ten minutes with cap off. Ink darker.
Bleed/Feather: Neither on 3 papers. [sic Actually 4: I wrote on the back of a one-a-day calendar page, with the JRR Tolkien quotation; and my less lucid graffito.]
Saturation: Quite high.
Shading: Little if any (with this nib.)

I think this ink is becoming rare, as people are writefully using it for max. effect, I hope. But just because the ink is holding up well, is no reason to hoard it.

Drawn Swatch : Parallel lines from the review pen.
Scanner Densitometer: Generated from the Drawn Swatch - Red 92; Green 103; Blue 178; Luminosity 115.
Swirlies : From the back of a dip pen nib. Intended to show range of possible densities from this ink.

Soapy Soak : Not shown - nothing left.
Rain Drop : Barely there.

Uses:
- Business: Might be used for Internal correspondence. Signatures.
- Personal: Definitely. Animated. Classy thrills. Can be used for friendly correspondence between opposite genders without imposition.
- Billet Doux: Love to get one written in this ink.
- Scarlett Johansson has this ink in her pen. Please, click me.

My penmanship remains dreadful. Ah me.
Not even an exquisite ink & pen can disguise that train wreck.

-30-

Note:
I still have some ink left in the pen, so if you want me to include anything else, please let me know soonest.
Bye,
S1


Edited by Sandy1, 31 March 2010 - 05:30.

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#2 vans4444

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 06:54

If this is Quink Sapphire it is my favourite colour ink. I have used advice from other threads to try and recreate it by mixing inks with reasonable sucess.

On my monitor the writing samples look a little lighter than I would expect.

Thanks for an excellent review

#3 Ed Ronax

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 12:58

Excellent review, thanks.
And how can this be, because he is the Kwisatz Haderach.


#4 kicksway99

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 13:43

Thanks for the review of the Sapphire ink -excellent presentation! It does seem to hold up well over time. I used the last bit of my Parker Sapphire ink last month and it still had the same intense blue color as when it was new. (Must have been 10-12 years old).

Does anyone know if there is a bottle of Parker Sapphire available anywhere? Have searched for sources but unable to locate the vintage ink.

Thanks ...
Kicks...
Kicks ...

#5 Sandy1

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 14:47

If this is Quink Sapphire it is my favourite colour ink. I have used advice from other threads to try and recreate it by mixing inks with reasonable sucess.

On my monitor the writing samples look a little lighter than I would expect.

Thanks for an excellent review

Hello,

I apologise for the glaring inexcusable spelling error of the ink name. The name on the box and bottle is
'Parker Penman Sapphire'

So it is not a 'Quink' ink.

On a personal note, I'd been using a Parker Sonnet with Parker Quink Blue-Black for years in school. When I finished school I was gifted with the Duofold. Well, I thought I'd better get some appropriate ink, a step up if you will, so there was Parker Penman Sapphire. Inasmuch as the Sonnet + Quink BlBk combo remain my daily writer for business, the Duofold + Penman Sapphire remains my preferred ink for writing certain people.

If you have dialed-in your monitor brightness and contrast to accurately depict the Grey Scale, then the ink density (light-dark) may indeed be due to my pen. If ink volume permits, I'll do a sample from the Sonnet, which is contemporary with the Duofold & ink, and the nib is also an 18K -M-.

I include the 'Swirlies', on the 3rd scanned page, to give one a fairly good idea of the entire density range of an ink: from super-wet to a dry-as-dust writer. Also, not shown, is a sample from years ago written with the same pen, but on an ELCO airmail paper, which shows the ink to have very similar density and 'look'.
Also, please take a look at the HiRes scan: in some places the written line overlaps numerous times, so that may be a further indicator of density. When I have a wee spare moment, I'll do a scan of the Swirlies+written sample+Grey Scale positioned in the same scanned image.

Many thanks for your observations & feedback.

Best Regards,
Sandy1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#6 Lloyd

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 15:03

In your eyes, are there any currently produced inks that (nearly) match this ink?
"Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination."
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#7 Sandy1

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 15:04

Thanks for the review of the Sapphire ink -excellent presentation! It does seem to hold up well over time. I used the last bit of my Parker Sapphire ink last month and it still had the same intense blue color as when it was new. (Must have been 10-12 years old).

Does anyone know if there is a bottle of Parker Sapphire available anywhere? Have searched for sources but unable to locate the vintage ink.

Thanks ...
Kicks...

Hello,

I'm glad you appreciate the Review. I thought this ink is was worth a re-Review.

I think its great you used all of your stock! The last of my Parker Penman Mocha went on Thank-you cards - which I thought was totally appropriate.

Like some of us, I keep an eye out for NOS in smaller shops that have Quink. So far no success, but who knows?

Oh, I pack my own parachute; and the codicil of my will bequeaths any remaining ink to 'kushbaby' should I pre-decease her. Besides, Scarlett has all the Sapphire this side of the Ganges. ;-)

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#8 vans4444

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 15:41

Yes, I misrembered. I have just looked at my Parker Sapphire and while the Penman brand does not appear on the box, it does appear in the tiny leaflet that came with the ink.

For background information I paste below two links about Penman ink.

Penman
Sapphire Blue*, Emerald Green*, Mocha Brown*, Black*, Ruby * These inks were discontinued in 2000. A much acclaimed product when released in 1993. Leighton Davies-Smith, an ink chemist with Parker, talked about the development of the Penman line of inks in a article published in Pen World. Davies-Smith said the ink took more than two years to develop the ink. Parker was aiming at producing an ink that would be quick drying on paper but slow drying on the nib to enhance a smooth writing experience. The bottled ink came from England and the cartridges came from France. The distinctive ink bottles were designed by Lansdown Conquest, design agency based in London.

Link to the above text

Penman
Penman fountain pen inks is a now discontinued ink label formerly manufactured by Parker. Released in 1993, they were withdrawn from the market when it was revealed, that the ink had problems with clogging, mostly with Penman Ebony (black). Distribution was voluntarily stopped in EU and NAFTA countries in 2000-2001

Link to the above text

#9 Sandy1

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 15:56

In your eyes, are there any currently produced inks that (nearly) match this ink?

Hi,

Well, I put up a swab of the Private Reserve 'American Blue' ink, which is supposed to have considerable similarity.

But, as I mentioned, replicating the PPS may well be done, but the intangibles are very elusive, and the nuances beyond subtle. These are the things that don't show-up on densitometers, etc., and likely make CMY+K mix matching impossible. (Double Ditto for Noodler's 'Baystate Blue'.)

Best Regards,
Sandy1

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#10 kicksway99

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 17:10

Hi Again!

In my desperate search for a replacement for the PPS, I have tried several "blues" including the PR American Blue. What I found was the closest to the PPS was the PR Midnight Blues or it's slightly darker version PR's Electric DC Blue. They are close and I use them as my standard work ink.

If one comes across another ink that mimics the PPS, please let us know.

Thanks ...

Kicks ...
Kicks ...

#11 vans4444

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 18:35

Hi Again!

In my desperate search for a replacement for the PPS, I have tried several "blues" including the PR American Blue. What I found was the closest to the PPS was the PR Midnight Blues or it's slightly darker version PR's Electric DC Blue. They are close and I use them as my standard work ink.

If one comes across another ink that mimics the PPS, please let us know.

Thanks ...

Kicks ...



These treads might help

Comparison to Sapphire

Mix your own (see OcalaFlGuy's post)

#12 kicksway99

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 19:12

Thank you! The OcalaFIGuy post may be a useful recipe to try.
Kicks ...

#13 Sandy1

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 21:28

Hi Again!

In my desperate search for a replacement for the PPS, I have tried several "blues" including the PR American Blue. What I found was the closest to the PPS was the PR Midnight Blues or it's slightly darker version PR's Electric DC Blue. They are close and I use them as my standard work ink.

If one comes across another ink that mimics the PPS, please let us know.

Thanks ...

Kicks ...

Hi,

I certainly will let you know if I come across another ink that mimics PPS. But - it'll just mimic.

Off-Thread:
I'm interested in seeing what goes on with a 'replacement' for the discontinued MB 'Racing Green'.
I don't recall seeing any 'Faux RG' recipe posts. I certainly have no motivation to fire-up the cyclotron in search of the right mix for FRG. But that's just me.

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#14 Sandy1

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 19:57

MORE SCANS - SECOND NIB || MORE SCANS - SECOND NIB || MORE SCANS - SECOND NIB ||

OK OK OK,

There was enough ink in the converter to switch to another pen : a Parker Sonnet with an 18K Bold Italic nib, factory stock.
definitely not a Duofold nib, but contemporary with the main Review pen & nib, and a 'cousin' of the Duofold.

To address questions of scan accuracy, and density (light-dark) of the pen-written samples, I have added the Sonnet-drawn swatch to the left of the Duofold swatch, and added a Grey Scale in close proximity:

Posted Image

Here are a few more written samples from the Sonnet:

Posted Image

====

Posted Image

===

Hi-Res Scan of the blocked text on 1st scan of this Post :

Posted Image

-30-


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#15 dannzeman

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 23:57

Wow, that is probably the most concise and complete ink review I've ever read. Please tell me you have more reviews out there... *off to look for myself*

#16 dcwaites

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 04:17

OK, I have just made some comparisons. I will post later, after the inks have had a chance to dry and stabilise.

I also have a new light source which I think gives a more accurate result - a desktop LED lamp. Previously I have been using CFLs, which make some dye components in the ink fluoresce, or dashing outside to use natural sunlight.

With that lamp, my results more nearly match Sandy1's results, except I think her pen is a little drier than mine.

I compared some original Parker Penman Sapphire with my Faux Penman Sapphire #8b, Waterman Florida Blue, PR American Blue and PR DC Supershow Blue.
The closest match, on Clairefontaine notebook paper, was the PR American Blue. The PR DC Supershow Blue is darker, and my #8b blend is a greener version of PR DC SS Blue.

One of the original considerations in my Faux Penman Sapphire was that the ink should behave on less than optimal paper as well as the original Penman Sapphire. I also didn't have the range of other inks and papers to try it on. My original recipe matches when I use a cotton bud swatch on Windsor & Newton Visual Diary art paper, but not on proper writing paper.

Legend has it that PR DC SS Blue was made to duplicate Parker Penman Sapphire, but my limited results seem to show that PR American Blue is a closer match.




Posted Image



#17 Sandy1

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 06:22

Wow, that is probably the most concise and complete ink review I've ever read. Please tell me you have more reviews out there... *off to look for myself*

Hi,

Glad you like it - too bad one can't just go buy the ink. Ooops!
So I really do apologise to those who do not have or cannot get this ink.
I did not intend it to be a "Look what I have (and you don't.)" sort of thing.
On that note, my review of the Lamy Green was a "Look what I have, (aren't you glad you don't?)" sort of thing.

IIRC, I did one IR of the new MB Midnight Blue, with comparison to the MB Blue-Black; a comparison of the prior and present iterations of the Parker Quink Blue-Black; and the aforementioned Lamy Green.

I'm still recovering from minor hip surgery, (just shaved down a socket spur - no biggie), so I may get another review or two done before I get back to full speed.

Best Regards,
Sandy1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#18 Sandy1

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 06:41

OK, I have just made some comparisons. I will post later, after the inks have had a chance to dry and stabilise.

I also have a new light source which I think gives a more accurate result - a desktop LED lamp. Previously I have been using CFLs, which make some dye components in the ink fluoresce, or dashing outside to use natural sunlight.

With that lamp, my results more nearly match Sandy1's results, except I think her pen is a little drier than mine.

I compared some original Parker Penman Sapphire with my Faux Penman Sapphire #8b, Waterman Florida Blue, PR American Blue and PR DC Supershow Blue.
The closest match, on Clairefontaine notebook paper, was the PR American Blue. The PR DC Supershow Blue is darker, and my #8b blend is a greener version of PR DC SS Blue.

One of the original considerations in my Faux Penman Sapphire was that the ink should behave on less than optimal paper as well as the original Penman Sapphire. I also didn't have the range of other inks and papers to try it on. My original recipe matches when I use a cotton bud swatch on Windsor & Newton Visual Diary art paper, but not on proper writing paper.

Legend has it that PR DC SS Blue was made to duplicate Parker Penman Sapphire, but my limited results seem to show that PR American Blue is a closer match.


Hi,

I had some of the 'American Blue' kicking around, but it didn't strike me that it was so close to PPS. I suppose that one sees what they expect to see - I wasn't expecting to see a 'close cousin' of PPS, so I didn't.

Light sources are critical for colour comparison, but the 'florescent' nature of some pigments jsu cannot be duplicated by the CMY+K mixers. I reckon if it took a bloke at Parker 2 years to get it right, I'll need more than a weekend, OK?

The writing experience, lubrication & flow, are ineffable. The Penman colours Mocha, Ruby & Emerald didn't have 'it' to the same degree. And I think they slipped away less-lamented than the Sapphire. (?)

Oh, I did use a 2nd pen that's wetter than the Duofold, but those scans are in a Post - not the Review proper.

Bye & Happy Easter (did everyone get their Araucana eggs?)
Sandy1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#19 trazo

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 07:34

Thanks for the review of the Sapphire ink -excellent presentation! It does seem to hold up well over time. I used the last bit of my Parker Sapphire ink last month and it still had the same intense blue color as when it was new. (Must have been 10-12 years old).

Does anyone know if there is a bottle of Parker Sapphire available anywhere? Have searched for sources but unable to locate the vintage ink.

Thanks ...
Kicks...



There is a store called Bauhaus in Andorra which used to sell Parker stuff and have a couple of FPs but several Penman Sapphire bottles. They have a version of the standard bottle together with a silver base which has to arms to hold a pen. It cost EUR 12 and from the five bottles I got none presents problems.

#20 bossy

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 00:26

Grey scale is great feature!
Blessed are they that do his commandments, that they may have right
to the tree of life, and may enter in through the gates into the city.
For without are dogs, and sorcerers, and whoremongers, and murderers,
and idolaters, and whosoever loveth and maketh a lie.
Revelation 22:14-15

#21 Sandy1

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 01:08

Grey scale is great feature!

Hi,

Thanks!

I tried so hard to find 'something' that people could relate to and find useful.

So the (Kodak) Grey Scale should get a person's monitor 'close' in terms of brightness & contrast. It is an absolute reference. i.e. It is calibrated, and conforms to strict QC. Colour, well, we know that's tough. I think the on-line web-based stuff is limited to some 256 colours. That is nowhere near a digital photo or even the scans from the inky original.

So I have to ask 'Fit For Purpose?' Yes or No, before I actually Post it. So far, so good. When I look at it in draft form, the scans should be close enough to be what I will call 'an honest representation' of the colour.

I also include the Waterman Florida Blue, as a relative reference. If so inclined, the viewer can make their own swatch and dial-in their monitor to that.

I'll let you know if it gets any easier.

Bye,
S1

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#22 dcwaites

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 02:19

As promised, here is my scan of my bottle of Parker Penman Sapphire, along with a couple of other samples --

Posted Image

From Ink Shots

This was written on an A5 Clairefontaine notebook, and left for the inks to stabilise for several days.
As noted, the pen used is a D. Leonardt's DP400 dip pen in 1/2 mm width.

As you can see, my Faux Penman Sapphire #8b is a little darker, but when used with a fountain pen is almost identical with the original.
However, the big surprise was how close the PR American Blue is to the original PP Sapphire.
The PR DC Supershow Blue, which legend has it was made to be a PP Sapphire clone, is actually a little darker.

If you follow the link, you can see the uploaded original and use the magnifier.




Posted Image



#23 Sandy1

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 05:14

As promised, here is my scan of my bottle of Parker Penman Sapphire, along with a couple of other samples --

Posted Image

From Ink Shots

This was written on an A5 Clairefontaine notebook, and left for the inks to stabilise for several days.
As noted, the pen used is a D. Leonardt's DP400 dip pen in 1/2 mm width.

As you can see, my Faux Penman Sapphire #8b is a little darker, but when used with a fountain pen is almost identical with the original.
However, the big surprise was how close the PR American Blue is to the original PP Sapphire.
The PR DC Supershow Blue, which legend has it was made to be a PP Sapphire clone, is actually a little darker.

If you follow the link, you can see the uploaded original and use the magnifier.

Hi,

Many thanks!

I think we're getting very similar results: the ink remains sssssennnnnsational & sound in the pot.

But looks better on the page.

The American Blue is the closest I've seen too - not to discount your faux mixes which are pretty darn amazing. Good on ya! The subtleties are not apparent in the scans though. The DCSB really is out of it, folklore being what it is.

The American Blue has nowhere near the physical properties of the PPS for enhancing the writing experience.

As to the density (light-dark) of the colour, I think that is one of the most telling signs of a top top shelf ink: it looks like itself throughout a range of densities that would be expected from 'normal' wetness nib+feeds. I think the 2 samples from the Duofold and the Sonnet give some indication of that range - the Duofold being more dry.

Later,
Sandy1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#24 drmom777

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 14:39

My daughter just gave me a full bottle of Parker Penman Sapphire yesterday. She says she got it at a yard sale. It is totally intact, no sediment or off odor. Now I am ant a fan of washable blue inks, so I was planning on mixing it with a permananent black to get blue-black that's more durable. Evidently this is sacrilege, so I guess I won't.

#25 Sandy1

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 15:14

My daughter just gave me a full bottle of Parker Penman Sapphire yesterday. She says she got it at a yard sale. It is totally intact, no sediment or off odor. Now I am ant a fan of washable blue inks, so I was planning on mixing it with a permananent black to get blue-black that's more durable. Evidently this is sacrilege, so I guess I won't.

Yikes! A little too much sharing on that one, OK? :-)
Oh, if your intention is to generate a 'more durable' BlBk, just get one. I found that mixed waterproof/bulletproof inks will remain on the paper, with the other less durable ink just disappearing, or worse - creating a 'smudge cloud', which obscures the most durable ink.
The PPS exhibits variable water resistance: depending on the paper used. I used to use it with the Swiss ELCO Airmail paper, and if it got wet, the writing was smeared but legible. Unfortunately that paper is not readily available, so I do not include it in my Review.
Enjoy the PPS in whatever incarnation you prefer: there are no 'sacrosanct' inks. (I used to think I'd never mix an Herbin until I did. Then I thought I'd never mix a Pilot iro ink until I did.)
Perhaps you'll get a Duofold too!!
Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#26 encremental

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 16:58

Great review, Sandy! I'd like to see your forensic approach extend to the other Penman inks, - especially Emerald and Ruby.

John

#27 dcwaites

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 02:24

My daughter just gave me a full bottle of Parker Penman Sapphire yesterday. She says she got it at a yard sale. It is totally intact, no sediment or off odor. Now I am ant a fan of washable blue inks, so I was planning on mixing it with a permananent black to get blue-black that's more durable. Evidently this is sacrilege, so I guess I won't.


If you want a good, permanent blue-black, then get one.

At this stage, I would recommend Lamy Blue-Black, but I will be testing it more. It is one of the iron-gall inks made for fountain pens, and it is called blue-black because it goes down blue and then turns to black. The only thing that will remove it once it has dried is bleach.

Otherwise you can get a reasonably persistent blue-black by mixing a pure blue ink with a pure black ink, in a ratio of 10:1 blue to black. Stick to the same brands, like Parker Quink Blue and PQ Black, or Sheaffer Skrip Blue and SS Black, for least problems. Adjust the ratio (by adding more or less Blue) to get the colour you want.

Oh, and enjoy your Penman Sapphire as it is. (Oh, and any child that gives you a full bottle of Parker Penman Sapphire is a treasure to keep...:cloud9:)



Edited by dcwaites, 25 April 2010 - 02:25.


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#28 Sandy1

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 04:18

Great review, Sandy! I'd like to see your forensic approach extend to the other Penman inks, - especially Emerald and Ruby.

John

Hello John,

I'm glad you find my approach to be of value. It is the first time that my approach is described as 'forensic'. Neat-o: it's usually called 'obsessive compulsive'. :-)

But really, some of my 'work-a-day' activities involve life-or-death decisions based on direct & indirect observation. So I'm just a good observer, and am not so bad at recording & conveying my observations.

Pardon my diversion. On point: I do not have bottles of the Penman inks to which you refer. The last of my Penman Mocha went onto 'Thank-You' notes - better than some dull ink review, yes? I do have a few cartridges of the Penman Ruby, but consider those (and any cartridge-packaged ink) to be flaky: the cartridges themselves do not uniformly preserve the ink. One needs only to see the uneven volumes of ink in cartridges stored for years. e.g. Some of the old Sheaffer calligraphy sets have cartridges, and the volumes of ink in each cartridge is different. So I decline to test anything that is contaminated or otherwise 'scr*wed-up' - why bother? - no one else will have the same thing. ... On that note, I do have a PM thread going, which seems to be encouraging people to retain their Ink Review originals, then every so on, scan & post them. In that way, the stability of ink over time, on a variety of paper, stored in 'for real' conditions, may be seen. But I digress.

Have a nice day!

S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#29 Sandy1

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Posted 21 October 2011 - 08:56

Hi,

To support ad hoc comparison to other inks of similar colour, I have revisited Parker Penman Sapphire (PPS) to add more samples. These samples use much the same layout, papers, pens and imaging method as the current reviews of Blue inks.

As always, should one feel that a separate Post or Topic is required to depict a certain aspect of an ink, your PM will be welcomed. While new scans can be accommodated in due course, creation of even more new written material is unlikely.

-=-


NIB-ism:

IMG-thumb:
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L → R: Parker 51 Flighter + 14K XF nib; Sheaffer 330 + steel M nib; Lamy Pink Safari + goosed 1.1 steel nib.


Written Samples - Moby Dick
Ruling: 8mm.

Paper: HPJ1124.
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Paper: Rhodia.
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OTHER STUFF
Smear/Dry Times
Wet Tests
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Comments:
  • Results are generally consistent with prior samples.
  • The writing experience is luxurious. (Wiggle toes.)
  • Over time, the ink has retained its original characteristics to a significant extent.

======
TAGS: FPN fountain pen ink review Parker Penman Sapphire Sandy1


The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#30 SamCapote

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 05:40

It still amazes me that some nitwits convinced Parker to withdraw this ink. Excellent review, Sandy. You captured the elegant magic of this ink very well, even if none of us can read your writing. LOL! :cloud9:
With the new FPN rules, now I REALLY don't know what to put in my signature.