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Parker Duofold repair questions


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#1 faullin

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 20:36

I recently discovered my grandfather's Parker Duofold fountain pen. I'd really like to use it. However, being a novice, the only fountain pens I've ben exposed to are those with plastic cartridges. From what I've read and seen, this is a button type ink system. And, from what I've read on this forum, the sac is probably unusable and needs to be replaced.

I've tried to remove the section to get at the sac, with no success. Any suggestions?

Attached is a picture of the pen.

Thanks for the help!

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  • Duofold pen.JPG


#2 gyasko

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 21:28

What worked for me was:

1. Soaking the barrel/section joint for a couple hours
2. heat applied only to the barrel threads. I made rudimentary heat shields for section and barrel and attached them with masking tape.
3. Since i couldn't open it with just my hands (YMMV) and rubber grippies, i had to resort to a Bionic wrench. I used a 1/2" piece of milk line tubing to protect the section from the wrench.

#3 OiRogers

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Posted 28 March 2010 - 01:35

Often times the section will be shellaced to the body... minor heat is usually the answer to break that seal. If one isn't careful, you can damage the pen with the flame or with the pressure used to separate the pieces. Shellac will usually become pliable around 140F... problem is, the feed often will become pliable around the same temperature so dipping the pen into hot water to reach that temperature isn't a good idea. A blow dryer can be used... tape a bit off at the front to direct the flow a bit better. A heat gun (used for paint stripping) will also do the trick and is perhaps the best option these days. An open flame from an alcohol lamp also works, but it isn't something I'd try on a pen I had attachment too for my first venture into Vintage Pen + Open Flame = ????? type learning.

Being that this pen probably has some sentimental value to you, I'd suggest sending it out to someone to resac for you. That, or buy a pile of cheap-o vintage pens off the 'bay and learn how to resac on your own.

#4 faullin

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Posted 28 March 2010 - 14:06

Thanks for the help! I soaked it overnight and it twited right of in the morning. No threads, just a tight seal.

However, the pressure bar (I think that's correct term) has corroded over time and the about 1/4" that goes in the button has broken away. And the sac is rotted. Everything else looks good. So, it appears I need a sac and a pressure bar.

I like the idea of buying a few old pens on ebay and saccing them first, since, as you said, the pen does have sentimental value.

In the meantime, any tips on how to remove the nib abd the sawtooth thingy (looking for the right term here) from the section?

Thanks! This is turning out to be fun and enjoyable!

#5 eckiethump

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Posted 28 March 2010 - 14:50

Thanks for the help! I soaked it overnight and it twited right of in the morning. No threads, just a tight seal.

However, the pressure bar (I think that's correct term) has corroded over time and the about 1/4" that goes in the button has broken away. And the sac is rotted. Everything else looks good. So, it appears I need a sac and a pressure bar.

I like the idea of buying a few old pens on ebay and saccing them first, since, as you said, the pen does have sentimental value.

In the meantime, any tips on how to remove the nib abd the sawtooth thingy (looking for the right term here) from the section?

Thanks! This is turning out to be fun and enjoyable!


Honestly, either put this away and practice on pens of no value to you, or send it out for repair. The answers to the questions you are asking, are all in previous threads here, if you use the search button.

Don't practice on this pen !!! It might seem easy, on instruction and mechanics. Only experience will tell you how much heat and pressure is required. Unfortunately that is what you find out, after you have broken the pen, you used too much.
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#6 OiRogers

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Posted 28 March 2010 - 15:32

No threads, just a tight seal.


Doh!... Streamline pen (obvious from 2nd look at photos)... equals a pressure / slip fit. They can also be / have been shellaced in place... if yours fits tight enough, it isn't necessary.

Pressure bars are available from sources such as Tryphon for just a few dollars and are easy to fit... the Duofold Sr is a standard size.

Unless you need to remove the nib and feed for repair work I'd suggest leaving them intact... a good soak and flush should clean it up pretty well.

#7 freehand

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 00:46

Given that the pen is fairly valuable and also a family heirloom, I'd second the suggestion to either put it away for a year or so while you practice your restoration skills, or send it to a restorer who knows these pens and is likely to have the parts (a pressure bar) needed to get it in working order.

I bought a Parker Duofold Senior (Big Red) with a missing blind cap. Besides the rotted sac, I found that it had a cracked section and a corroded pressure bar. After searching online for the necessary parts, I sent it to Jake Leventhal, who did a fine job and also re-plated the clip. He also e-mailed regularly to keep me up to date and confirm exactly what I wanted done. His website's worth a look:

Jake's Pens

Edited by freehand, 29 March 2010 - 00:46.


#8 gyasko

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 02:00

I think once he's gotten this far, there's little danger in giving this a new sac. But why knock the nib & feed out? Is there something wrong with them? If not, it's best to leave the nib and feed alone. Don't fix what isn't broken.

Oops -- i also missed that this was a streamline. Sorry.

#9 Garageboy

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 16:59

This is no longer a lucky curve feed, right?