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Parker Challenger Repairs


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#1 jktwisc

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 02:36

This is my first post on FPN so hello all! I am new to fountain pens (only have my first one I recently bought, a Pelikan M150). I was recently given a Parker Challenger by a family member but it does not seem to be working. It has what I think is called a 'push button' filler and it seems to be stuck. How do I go about taking the pen apart to clean it and see what the problem is? Also, what is the best way to go about cleaning it? I would love to get it working if possible. It seem like a great pen!

Thanks everyone!

#2 LedZepGirl

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 07:38

Okay, it may seem a bit daunting at first but you're in luck because button fillers are some of the simplest pens to repair. First you need to pull the button out, grip it with your fingers and pull it straight up out of the pen. Once it is out you will see the pressure bar, which is that piece of thin steel you will see sticking up that the button covered. That needs to be pulled out too, but it might not come out all that easily because the old hardened sac (the rubber thingy that holds the ink in the pen barrel) could be stuck to it. If it is stuck like that, gently twist it around to try and loosen up the old sac. Once it is loose it can be gently pulled out. The reason I'm suggesting you do that first is because the old hardened ink sac could very well be stuck to the pressure bar and that will make removing the section more difficult.

Now to remove the section (the black part that the nib and feed are housed in and connects to the barrel) you will probably need a hair drier to heat the pen. Heat makes it easier to remove the section and lessens the risk of cracking the pen at the threads. A heat gun can be used too, but I tend to avoid them because they can get too hot and melt the pen- if you do use one be cautious of how hot the pen is getting. After heating the pen around the threads firmly pull on the section or give it a twist as Challengers do not have threaded sections. If it doesn't want to move allow it to cool and heat it again, it may take a few tries before the section will move as the pen most likely hasn't been opened in years. Don't rush it either or you could wind up damaging your pen. Once the section does come out remove the fragments of the old sac and wash the pen with cool water until all of the old ink is gone. The nib and section can be soaked in a bowl of cool water to remove dry ink and can also be flushed out with an eyedropper. If the nib and feed are clogged soak it for awhile in one part ammonia to three parts water (I think that is correct, if it isn't someone else say something!)

Once the pen is cleaned you will need a new sac. They can be purchased here... www.pensacs.com (no affiliation) they have a sizing chart where you look up your pen model and find the size you will need. To attach the sac you will need a can of amber shellac, which can be purchased at any hardware store, DO NOT USE SUPER GLUE! After the sac has been attached the pen can be put back together.

There, is that good enough? smile.gif


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#3 Buzz J

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 12:45

QUOTE (LedZepGirl @ Jul 26 2009, 02:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Okay, it may seem a bit daunting at first but you're in luck because button fillers are some of the simplest pens to repair. First you need to pull the button out, grip it with your fingers and pull it straight up out of the pen. Once it is out you will see the pressure bar, which is that piece of thin steel you will see sticking up that the button covered. That needs to be pulled out too, but it might not come out all that easily because the old hardened sac (the rubber thingy that holds the ink in the pen barrel) could be stuck to it. If it is stuck like that, gently twist it around to try and loosen up the old sac. Once it is loose it can be gently pulled out. The reason I'm suggesting you do that first is because the old hardened ink sac could very well be stuck to the pressure bar and that will make removing the section more difficult.

Now to remove the section (the black part that the nib and feed are housed in and connects to the barrel) you will probably need a hair drier to heat the pen. Heat makes it easier to remove the section and lessens the risk of cracking the pen at the threads. A heat gun can be used too, but I tend to avoid them because they can get too hot and melt the pen- if you do use one be cautious of how hot the pen is getting. After heating the pen around the threads firmly pull on the section or give it a twist as Challengers do not have threaded sections. If it doesn't want to move allow it to cool and heat it again, it may take a few tries before the section will move as the pen most likely hasn't been opened in years. Don't rush it either or you could wind up damaging your pen. Once the section does come out remove the fragments of the old sac and wash the pen with cool water until all of the old ink is gone. The nib and section can be soaked in a bowl of cool water to remove dry ink and can also be flushed out with an eyedropper. If the nib and feed are clogged soak it for awhile in one part ammonia to three parts water (I think that is correct, if it isn't someone else say something!)

Once the pen is cleaned you will need a new sac. They can be purchased here... www.pensacs.com (no affiliation) they have a sizing chart where you look up your pen model and find the size you will need. To attach the sac you will need a can of amber shellac, which can be purchased at any hardware store, DO NOT USE SUPER GLUE! After the sac has been attached the pen can be put back together.

There, is that good enough? smile.gif


Perfect!

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#4 jktwisc

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 13:31

QUOTE (Buzz J @ Jul 26 2009, 07:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (LedZepGirl @ Jul 26 2009, 02:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Okay, it may seem a bit daunting at first but you're in luck because button fillers are some of the simplest pens to repair. First you need to pull the button out, grip it with your fingers and pull it straight up out of the pen. Once it is out you will see the pressure bar, which is that piece of thin steel you will see sticking up that the button covered. That needs to be pulled out too, but it might not come out all that easily because the old hardened sac (the rubber thingy that holds the ink in the pen barrel) could be stuck to it. If it is stuck like that, gently twist it around to try and loosen up the old sac. Once it is loose it can be gently pulled out. The reason I'm suggesting you do that first is because the old hardened ink sac could very well be stuck to the pressure bar and that will make removing the section more difficult.

Now to remove the section (the black part that the nib and feed are housed in and connects to the barrel) you will probably need a hair drier to heat the pen. Heat makes it easier to remove the section and lessens the risk of cracking the pen at the threads. A heat gun can be used too, but I tend to avoid them because they can get too hot and melt the pen- if you do use one be cautious of how hot the pen is getting. After heating the pen around the threads firmly pull on the section or give it a twist as Challengers do not have threaded sections. If it doesn't want to move allow it to cool and heat it again, it may take a few tries before the section will move as the pen most likely hasn't been opened in years. Don't rush it either or you could wind up damaging your pen. Once the section does come out remove the fragments of the old sac and wash the pen with cool water until all of the old ink is gone. The nib and section can be soaked in a bowl of cool water to remove dry ink and can also be flushed out with an eyedropper. If the nib and feed are clogged soak it for awhile in one part ammonia to three parts water (I think that is correct, if it isn't someone else say something!)

Once the pen is cleaned you will need a new sac. They can be purchased here... www.pensacs.com (no affiliation) they have a sizing chart where you look up your pen model and find the size you will need. To attach the sac you will need a can of amber shellac, which can be purchased at any hardware store, DO NOT USE SUPER GLUE! After the sac has been attached the pen can be put back together.

There, is that good enough? smile.gif


Perfect!



Sounds like I have my first rebuild project on my hands! Thanks for the perfect step by step post. I will post how it turns out and possibly some new pictures.


#5 LedZepGirl

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 17:53

QUOTE (jktwisc @ Jul 26 2009, 09:31 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Buzz J @ Jul 26 2009, 07:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (LedZepGirl @ Jul 26 2009, 02:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Okay, it may seem a bit daunting at first but you're in luck because button fillers are some of the simplest pens to repair. First you need to pull the button out, grip it with your fingers and pull it straight up out of the pen. Once it is out you will see the pressure bar, which is that piece of thin steel you will see sticking up that the button covered. That needs to be pulled out too, but it might not come out all that easily because the old hardened sac (the rubber thingy that holds the ink in the pen barrel) could be stuck to it. If it is stuck like that, gently twist it around to try and loosen up the old sac. Once it is loose it can be gently pulled out. The reason I'm suggesting you do that first is because the old hardened ink sac could very well be stuck to the pressure bar and that will make removing the section more difficult.

Now to remove the section (the black part that the nib and feed are housed in and connects to the barrel) you will probably need a hair drier to heat the pen. Heat makes it easier to remove the section and lessens the risk of cracking the pen at the threads. A heat gun can be used too, but I tend to avoid them because they can get too hot and melt the pen- if you do use one be cautious of how hot the pen is getting. After heating the pen around the threads firmly pull on the section or give it a twist as Challengers do not have threaded sections. If it doesn't want to move allow it to cool and heat it again, it may take a few tries before the section will move as the pen most likely hasn't been opened in years. Don't rush it either or you could wind up damaging your pen. Once the section does come out remove the fragments of the old sac and wash the pen with cool water until all of the old ink is gone. The nib and section can be soaked in a bowl of cool water to remove dry ink and can also be flushed out with an eyedropper. If the nib and feed are clogged soak it for awhile in one part ammonia to three parts water (I think that is correct, if it isn't someone else say something!)

Once the pen is cleaned you will need a new sac. They can be purchased here... www.pensacs.com (no affiliation) they have a sizing chart where you look up your pen model and find the size you will need. To attach the sac you will need a can of amber shellac, which can be purchased at any hardware store, DO NOT USE SUPER GLUE! After the sac has been attached the pen can be put back together.

There, is that good enough? smile.gif


Perfect!



Sounds like I have my first rebuild project on my hands! Thanks for the perfect step by step post. I will post how it turns out and possibly some new pictures.



Sounds good. Btw, you're welcome, this is what we do here at FPN, help people out when they have questions like this. If you have any more feel free to post them.
I'd rather spend my money on pens instead of shoes and handbags.

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#6 jktwisc

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 02:41

QUOTE (LedZepGirl @ Jul 26 2009, 12:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (jktwisc @ Jul 26 2009, 09:31 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Buzz J @ Jul 26 2009, 07:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (LedZepGirl @ Jul 26 2009, 02:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Okay, it may seem a bit daunting at first but you're in luck because button fillers are some of the simplest pens to repair. First you need to pull the button out, grip it with your fingers and pull it straight up out of the pen. Once it is out you will see the pressure bar, which is that piece of thin steel you will see sticking up that the button covered. That needs to be pulled out too, but it might not come out all that easily because the old hardened sac (the rubber thingy that holds the ink in the pen barrel) could be stuck to it. If it is stuck like that, gently twist it around to try and loosen up the old sac. Once it is loose it can be gently pulled out. The reason I'm suggesting you do that first is because the old hardened ink sac could very well be stuck to the pressure bar and that will make removing the section more difficult.

Now to remove the section (the black part that the nib and feed are housed in and connects to the barrel) you will probably need a hair drier to heat the pen. Heat makes it easier to remove the section and lessens the risk of cracking the pen at the threads. A heat gun can be used too, but I tend to avoid them because they can get too hot and melt the pen- if you do use one be cautious of how hot the pen is getting. After heating the pen around the threads firmly pull on the section or give it a twist as Challengers do not have threaded sections. If it doesn't want to move allow it to cool and heat it again, it may take a few tries before the section will move as the pen most likely hasn't been opened in years. Don't rush it either or you could wind up damaging your pen. Once the section does come out remove the fragments of the old sac and wash the pen with cool water until all of the old ink is gone. The nib and section can be soaked in a bowl of cool water to remove dry ink and can also be flushed out with an eyedropper. If the nib and feed are clogged soak it for awhile in one part ammonia to three parts water (I think that is correct, if it isn't someone else say something!)

Once the pen is cleaned you will need a new sac. They can be purchased here... www.pensacs.com (no affiliation) they have a sizing chart where you look up your pen model and find the size you will need. To attach the sac you will need a can of amber shellac, which can be purchased at any hardware store, DO NOT USE SUPER GLUE! After the sac has been attached the pen can be put back together.

There, is that good enough? smile.gif


Perfect!



Sounds like I have my first rebuild project on my hands! Thanks for the perfect step by step post. I will post how it turns out and possibly some new pictures.



Sounds good. Btw, you're welcome, this is what we do here at FPN, help people out when they have questions like this. If you have any more feel free to post them.


Hey, out of curiosity, I looked at the nib and it seems to be 'bent' (one side of the nib is slightly higher then the other). I did a little research and ran across some parker pens that had what is called a 'flex nib'. Does anyone know if this could be that or if the nib is in fact, bent?

Edited by jktwisc, 27 July 2009 - 02:42.


#7 jktwisc

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 03:12

QUOTE (jktwisc @ Jul 26 2009, 09:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (LedZepGirl @ Jul 26 2009, 12:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (jktwisc @ Jul 26 2009, 09:31 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Buzz J @ Jul 26 2009, 07:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (LedZepGirl @ Jul 26 2009, 02:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Okay, it may seem a bit daunting at first but you're in luck because button fillers are some of the simplest pens to repair. First you need to pull the button out, grip it with your fingers and pull it straight up out of the pen. Once it is out you will see the pressure bar, which is that piece of thin steel you will see sticking up that the button covered. That needs to be pulled out too, but it might not come out all that easily because the old hardened sac (the rubber thingy that holds the ink in the pen barrel) could be stuck to it. If it is stuck like that, gently twist it around to try and loosen up the old sac. Once it is loose it can be gently pulled out. The reason I'm suggesting you do that first is because the old hardened ink sac could very well be stuck to the pressure bar and that will make removing the section more difficult.

Now to remove the section (the black part that the nib and feed are housed in and connects to the barrel) you will probably need a hair drier to heat the pen. Heat makes it easier to remove the section and lessens the risk of cracking the pen at the threads. A heat gun can be used too, but I tend to avoid them because they can get too hot and melt the pen- if you do use one be cautious of how hot the pen is getting. After heating the pen around the threads firmly pull on the section or give it a twist as Challengers do not have threaded sections. If it doesn't want to move allow it to cool and heat it again, it may take a few tries before the section will move as the pen most likely hasn't been opened in years. Don't rush it either or you could wind up damaging your pen. Once the section does come out remove the fragments of the old sac and wash the pen with cool water until all of the old ink is gone. The nib and section can be soaked in a bowl of cool water to remove dry ink and can also be flushed out with an eyedropper. If the nib and feed are clogged soak it for awhile in one part ammonia to three parts water (I think that is correct, if it isn't someone else say something!)

Once the pen is cleaned you will need a new sac. They can be purchased here... www.pensacs.com (no affiliation) they have a sizing chart where you look up your pen model and find the size you will need. To attach the sac you will need a can of amber shellac, which can be purchased at any hardware store, DO NOT USE SUPER GLUE! After the sac has been attached the pen can be put back together.

There, is that good enough? smile.gif


Perfect!



Sounds like I have my first rebuild project on my hands! Thanks for the perfect step by step post. I will post how it turns out and possibly some new pictures.



Sounds good. Btw, you're welcome, this is what we do here at FPN, help people out when they have questions like this. If you have any more feel free to post them.


Hey, out of curiosity, I looked at the nib and it seems to be 'bent' (one side of the nib is slightly higher then the other). I did a little research and ran across some parker pens that had what is called a 'flex nib'. Does anyone know if this could be that or if the nib is in fact, bent?


I began the project tonight and have one question, I pulled out the button, the pressure rod (it was 2 separate parts put together) and also followed your heating idea and got the nib and the black connector (not sure if it is called anything) out. I am not sure if I / how to get the sac out. It seems that it may still be in the pen. How do you remove the sac? (it did not come out attached to the nib / connector if it should have).


#8 LedZepGirl

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 05:45

QUOTE (jktwisc @ Jul 26 2009, 11:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (jktwisc @ Jul 26 2009, 09:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (LedZepGirl @ Jul 26 2009, 12:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (jktwisc @ Jul 26 2009, 09:31 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Buzz J @ Jul 26 2009, 07:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (LedZepGirl @ Jul 26 2009, 02:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Okay, it may seem a bit daunting at first but you're in luck because button fillers are some of the simplest pens to repair. First you need to pull the button out, grip it with your fingers and pull it straight up out of the pen. Once it is out you will see the pressure bar, which is that piece of thin steel you will see sticking up that the button covered. That needs to be pulled out too, but it might not come out all that easily because the old hardened sac (the rubber thingy that holds the ink in the pen barrel) could be stuck to it. If it is stuck like that, gently twist it around to try and loosen up the old sac. Once it is loose it can be gently pulled out. The reason I'm suggesting you do that first is because the old hardened ink sac could very well be stuck to the pressure bar and that will make removing the section more difficult.

Now to remove the section (the black part that the nib and feed are housed in and connects to the barrel) you will probably need a hair drier to heat the pen. Heat makes it easier to remove the section and lessens the risk of cracking the pen at the threads. A heat gun can be used too, but I tend to avoid them because they can get too hot and melt the pen- if you do use one be cautious of how hot the pen is getting. After heating the pen around the threads firmly pull on the section or give it a twist as Challengers do not have threaded sections. If it doesn't want to move allow it to cool and heat it again, it may take a few tries before the section will move as the pen most likely hasn't been opened in years. Don't rush it either or you could wind up damaging your pen. Once the section does come out remove the fragments of the old sac and wash the pen with cool water until all of the old ink is gone. The nib and section can be soaked in a bowl of cool water to remove dry ink and can also be flushed out with an eyedropper. If the nib and feed are clogged soak it for awhile in one part ammonia to three parts water (I think that is correct, if it isn't someone else say something!)

Once the pen is cleaned you will need a new sac. They can be purchased here... www.pensacs.com (no affiliation) they have a sizing chart where you look up your pen model and find the size you will need. To attach the sac you will need a can of amber shellac, which can be purchased at any hardware store, DO NOT USE SUPER GLUE! After the sac has been attached the pen can be put back together.

There, is that good enough? smile.gif


Perfect!



Sounds like I have my first rebuild project on my hands! Thanks for the perfect step by step post. I will post how it turns out and possibly some new pictures.



Sounds good. Btw, you're welcome, this is what we do here at FPN, help people out when they have questions like this. If you have any more feel free to post them.


Hey, out of curiosity, I looked at the nib and it seems to be 'bent' (one side of the nib is slightly higher then the other). I did a little research and ran across some parker pens that had what is called a 'flex nib'. Does anyone know if this could be that or if the nib is in fact, bent?


I began the project tonight and have one question, I pulled out the button, the pressure rod (it was 2 separate parts put together) and also followed your heating idea and got the nib and the black connector (not sure if it is called anything) out. I am not sure if I / how to get the sac out. It seems that it may still be in the pen. How do you remove the sac? (it did not come out attached to the nib / connector if it should have).



Well, it does sound like your nib is probably a bit bent. It's unusual to find Challengers with flex nibs. That can be fixed by gently pressing the tine of the nib back down, or up depending on which direction is has been bent in.

As for the sac, it's unusual that they come out still attached to the back of the section (the back piece that connects the nib to the pen). To get the sac out get a tweezer and pull it out. Or if you can get your hands on a hairpin, bend it open and use it to chip out the pieces of the old sac. It should be really brittle and come out easily. The pressure bar is suppose to be two different pieces, that's completely normal.
I hope that answers everything.
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#9 OcalaFlGuy

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 06:22

What I use for stuck in sac (pieces) is a dental scaler. They have them with a different tool on each end. The one I like has what looks almost like a small knife blade on one end and a scoper cup on the other. These are often available at fleamarkets or I think Tryphon also has a few different ones.

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#10 HLeopold

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 13:45

QUOTE (OcalaFlGuy @ Jul 28 2009, 01:22 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
What I use for stuck in sac (pieces) is a dental scaler. They have them with a different tool on each end. The one I like has what looks almost like a small knife blade on one end and a scoper cup on the other. These are often available at fleamarkets or I think Tryphon also has a few different ones.

Bruce in Ocala, FL


Or a thin knitting (or crochet) needle will also work quite well. I borrow one from Diane when I have a dead sac stuck inside of the barrel (with Diane hovering over me making sure I don't damage her needles.)
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#11 jktwisc

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 14:45

QUOTE (HLeopold @ Jul 28 2009, 08:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (OcalaFlGuy @ Jul 28 2009, 01:22 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
What I use for stuck in sac (pieces) is a dental scaler. They have them with a different tool on each end. The one I like has what looks almost like a small knife blade on one end and a scoper cup on the other. These are often available at fleamarkets or I think Tryphon also has a few different ones.

Bruce in Ocala, FL


Or a thin knitting (or crochet) needle will also work quite well. I borrow one from Diane when I have a dead sac stuck inside of the barrel (with Diane hovering over me making sure I don't damage her needles.)



How do you know when all the old sac is gone? Should you be able to see all the way through the body? My other question was if anyone knew of the correct sac size for this parker challenger (not a delux). according to pensacs it is either small (20 straight) or large (17 1/2 - 2 1/8 necked). I assume it is the small 20 straight since this pen is somewhat short compared to others.

#12 ZeissIkon

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 00:35

A 20 is larger than 17 or 18 -- the sizing of a sac is diameter in 64ths of an inch. Best is to measure the pen, or get an assortment of sizes; the sacs I've seen with necks would have the neck cut off in virtually an installation anyway. A tapered sac, by contrast, gets smaller at the closed end, and allows use of a slightly larger sac size in a tapered barrel, increasing ink capacity without problems related to the sac being in too-close contact.

Generally, you should be able to shine a light into the barrel and see if there are any sac bits left, but a soft brush (nylon bristle bottle brush, ideally with a plastic, rather than metal core) might add peace of mind if you already have the pressure bar of whatever stripe out of the barrel.
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#13 jktwisc

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 19:29

QUOTE (ZeissIkon @ Jul 28 2009, 07:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
A 20 is larger than 17 or 18 -- the sizing of a sac is diameter in 64ths of an inch. Best is to measure the pen, or get an assortment of sizes; the sacs I've seen with necks would have the neck cut off in virtually an installation anyway. A tapered sac, by contrast, gets smaller at the closed end, and allows use of a slightly larger sac size in a tapered barrel, increasing ink capacity without problems related to the sac being in too-close contact.

Generally, you should be able to shine a light into the barrel and see if there are any sac bits left, but a soft brush (nylon bristle bottle brush, ideally with a plastic, rather than metal core) might add peace of mind if you already have the pressure bar of whatever stripe out of the barrel.


I feel I have removed all the old sac out. I just need to find a definite answer as to which sac to get from thesaccompany so I can put it all back together. Hopefully someone knows the size this pen takes.

#14 Ernst Bitterman

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 22:49

The difference between Challenger sizes is pretty clear-- the slender would never make you think "Stout" while the large one... well, have a look:

That's a pen that needs two seats at the theatre.

Edited by Ernst Bitterman, 29 July 2009 - 22:50.

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